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Water vapor flux in tropical lowland rice.
Environ Monit Assess. 2019 Aug 09; 191(9):550.EM

Abstract

A field experiment was conducted at Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha, India in the dry seasons of 2015 and 2016 to assess the water vapor flux (FH2O) and its relationship with other climatic variables. The FH2O and climatic variables were measured by an eddy covariance system and a micrometeorological observatory. Daily mean FH2O during the dry seasons of 2015 and 2016 were 0.009-0.092 g m-2 s-1 and 0.014-0.101 g m-2 s-1, respectively. Seasonal average FH2O was 14.6% higher in 2016 than that in 2015. Diurnal variation for FH2O showed a bell-shaped curve with its peak at 13:30-14:00 Indian Standard Time (IST) in both the years. Carbon dioxide flux was found higher with rise in FH2O. This relationship was stronger at higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) (20 ≤ VPD ≤ 40 and VPD > 40 hPa). The FH2O showed significant positive correlation with latent heat flux, net radiation flux, photosynthatically active radiation, air, water and soil temperatures, shortwave down and upwell radiations, maximum and minimum temperatures, evaporation, and relative humidity in both the years. Principal component analysis showed that FH2O was very close to latent heat flux in both the years (Pearson correlation coefficient close to 1). The two-dimensional observation map of the principal component F1 and F2 showed the observations taken during the vegetative stage and panicle initiation stage, and flowering stage and maturity stage were closer to each other. It can be concluded that the most important climatic variables controlling the FH2O were latent heat of vaporization, net radiation, air temperature, soil temperatures, and water temperature.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India. aknayak20@yahoo.com.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.Division of Crop Production, National Rice Research Institute, -753006, Cuttack, Odisha, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31396767

Citation

Chatterjee, Dibyendu, et al. "Water Vapor Flux in Tropical Lowland Rice." Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, vol. 191, no. 9, 2019, p. 550.
Chatterjee D, Nayak AK, Vijayakumar S, et al. Water vapor flux in tropical lowland rice. Environ Monit Assess. 2019;191(9):550.
Chatterjee, D., Nayak, A. K., Vijayakumar, S., Debnath, M., Chatterjee, S., Swain, C. K., Bihari, P., Mohanty, S., Tripathi, R., Shahid, M., Kumar, A., & Pathak, H. (2019). Water vapor flux in tropical lowland rice. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 191(9), 550. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-019-7709-4
Chatterjee D, et al. Water Vapor Flux in Tropical Lowland Rice. Environ Monit Assess. 2019 Aug 9;191(9):550. PubMed PMID: 31396767.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Water vapor flux in tropical lowland rice. AU - Chatterjee,Dibyendu, AU - Nayak,Amaresh Kumar, AU - Vijayakumar,S, AU - Debnath,Manish, AU - Chatterjee,Sumanta, AU - Swain,Chinmaya Kumar, AU - Bihari,Priyanka, AU - Mohanty,S, AU - Tripathi,Rahul, AU - Shahid,Mohammad, AU - Kumar,Anjani, AU - Pathak,H, Y1 - 2019/08/09/ PY - 2019/04/20/received PY - 2019/07/24/accepted PY - 2019/8/10/entrez PY - 2019/8/10/pubmed PY - 2019/10/28/medline KW - Eddy covariance KW - Net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide KW - Principal component analysis KW - Water vapor flux SP - 550 EP - 550 JF - Environmental monitoring and assessment JO - Environ Monit Assess VL - 191 IS - 9 N2 - A field experiment was conducted at Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha, India in the dry seasons of 2015 and 2016 to assess the water vapor flux (FH2O) and its relationship with other climatic variables. The FH2O and climatic variables were measured by an eddy covariance system and a micrometeorological observatory. Daily mean FH2O during the dry seasons of 2015 and 2016 were 0.009-0.092 g m-2 s-1 and 0.014-0.101 g m-2 s-1, respectively. Seasonal average FH2O was 14.6% higher in 2016 than that in 2015. Diurnal variation for FH2O showed a bell-shaped curve with its peak at 13:30-14:00 Indian Standard Time (IST) in both the years. Carbon dioxide flux was found higher with rise in FH2O. This relationship was stronger at higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) (20 ≤ VPD ≤ 40 and VPD > 40 hPa). The FH2O showed significant positive correlation with latent heat flux, net radiation flux, photosynthatically active radiation, air, water and soil temperatures, shortwave down and upwell radiations, maximum and minimum temperatures, evaporation, and relative humidity in both the years. Principal component analysis showed that FH2O was very close to latent heat flux in both the years (Pearson correlation coefficient close to 1). The two-dimensional observation map of the principal component F1 and F2 showed the observations taken during the vegetative stage and panicle initiation stage, and flowering stage and maturity stage were closer to each other. It can be concluded that the most important climatic variables controlling the FH2O were latent heat of vaporization, net radiation, air temperature, soil temperatures, and water temperature. SN - 1573-2959 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31396767/Water_vapor_flux_in_tropical_lowland_rice L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-019-7709-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -