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Incontinence and headache in preschool children.
Neurourol Urodyn. 2019 11; 38(8):2280-2287.NU

Abstract

AIMS

Headaches in preschool children are associated with behavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms. As the co-occurrence with incontinence is not known in young children, the aim of the study was to examine associations of headache, psychological symptoms and nocturnal enuresis (NE), daytime urinary incontinence (DUI), and fecal incontinence (FI) in a population-based sample of preschool children.

METHODS

All preschool children of a defined geographical area were examined at school-entry. Parents completed a 22-item questionnaire, including 14 headache, 4 incontinence, and 25 items of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Five hundred eighty-five children (50.4% males) with a mean age of 5.8 years were included.

RESULTS

In total, 27.2% of all children had headaches. 15.7% had secondary and 11.3% primary headaches. Five children had migraine and five tension-type headaches, while all others were unclassifiable. 9.4% of children had incontinence (7.7% NE; 2.4% DUI, 1.2% FI) and 4.0% constipation. The rates of incontinence did not differ between children with primary and those without headache for NE (12.9% vs 7.5%), DUI (3.1% vs 2.7%) or FI (3.0% vs 1.0%), but for constipation (12.1% vs 2.6%). Incontinent children had significantly more behavioral and externalizing symptoms, children with headache more internalizing problems. Primary headache was a significant predictor for internalizing, while constipation and FI were predictors for externalizing symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

This population-based study showed that headache is associated with constipation, but not with incontinence in preschool children. Headache and incontinence are common risk factors for specific psychological symptoms and should be assessed in clinical practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Institute for Community Health, Saarpfalz Kreis, Homburg, Germany.Institute for Community Health, Saarpfalz Kreis, Homburg, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31397011

Citation

von Gontard, Alexander, et al. "Incontinence and Headache in Preschool Children." Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol. 38, no. 8, 2019, pp. 2280-2287.
von Gontard A, Overs C, Moritz AM, et al. Incontinence and headache in preschool children. Neurourol Urodyn. 2019;38(8):2280-2287.
von Gontard, A., Overs, C., Moritz, A. M., Thomé-Granz, S., & Hussong, J. (2019). Incontinence and headache in preschool children. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 38(8), 2280-2287. https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.24134
von Gontard A, et al. Incontinence and Headache in Preschool Children. Neurourol Urodyn. 2019;38(8):2280-2287. PubMed PMID: 31397011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incontinence and headache in preschool children. AU - von Gontard,Alexander, AU - Overs,Cornelia, AU - Moritz,Anna-Michaela, AU - Thomé-Granz,Sigrid, AU - Hussong,Justine, Y1 - 2019/08/08/ PY - 2019/05/01/received PY - 2019/07/19/accepted PY - 2019/8/10/pubmed PY - 2020/4/21/medline PY - 2019/8/10/entrez KW - daytime urinary incontinence KW - epidemiology KW - fecal incontinence KW - headache KW - migraine KW - nocturnal enuresis KW - preschool children SP - 2280 EP - 2287 JF - Neurourology and urodynamics JO - Neurourol Urodyn VL - 38 IS - 8 N2 - AIMS: Headaches in preschool children are associated with behavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms. As the co-occurrence with incontinence is not known in young children, the aim of the study was to examine associations of headache, psychological symptoms and nocturnal enuresis (NE), daytime urinary incontinence (DUI), and fecal incontinence (FI) in a population-based sample of preschool children. METHODS: All preschool children of a defined geographical area were examined at school-entry. Parents completed a 22-item questionnaire, including 14 headache, 4 incontinence, and 25 items of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Five hundred eighty-five children (50.4% males) with a mean age of 5.8 years were included. RESULTS: In total, 27.2% of all children had headaches. 15.7% had secondary and 11.3% primary headaches. Five children had migraine and five tension-type headaches, while all others were unclassifiable. 9.4% of children had incontinence (7.7% NE; 2.4% DUI, 1.2% FI) and 4.0% constipation. The rates of incontinence did not differ between children with primary and those without headache for NE (12.9% vs 7.5%), DUI (3.1% vs 2.7%) or FI (3.0% vs 1.0%), but for constipation (12.1% vs 2.6%). Incontinent children had significantly more behavioral and externalizing symptoms, children with headache more internalizing problems. Primary headache was a significant predictor for internalizing, while constipation and FI were predictors for externalizing symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study showed that headache is associated with constipation, but not with incontinence in preschool children. Headache and incontinence are common risk factors for specific psychological symptoms and should be assessed in clinical practice. SN - 1520-6777 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31397011/Incontinence_and_headache_in_preschool_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.24134 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -