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Are smoking intensity and cessation related to cataract surgical risk in diabetic patients? Findings from the 45 and Up Study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To investigate if smoking was related to the risk of cataract surgery in diabetic patients.

METHODS

A total of 9578 diabetic participants aged 45-65 years were enrolled from the 45 and Up Study, the largest population-based cohort study in Australia. Baseline questionnaire data were linked to the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) database, which were both available from 2004 to 2016. Cataract surgery was determined according to the MBS. Smoking status were assessed by questionnaire. Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between smoking and incidence of cataract surgery during the follow-up.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 995 participants underwent cataract surgery with a corresponding incidence of 12.4 cases per 1000 person-years. In all, 10.8% of participants were current smokers at baseline, 38.7% were former smokers, and 50.5% were never smokers. The incidence of cataract surgery was non-significantly higher in never-smoker compared to former or current smokers. Regression analysis showed no significant difference in cataract surgical risk among former, current, and never smokers. In addition, neither time since quitting of smoking nor age at quitting was associated with the risk of cataract surgery, although there was a marginally significant trend in a lower risk of cataract surgery with longer smoking cessation time for participant with normal weight (P for trend = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Despite that smoking was found to be related to the cataract and cataract surgery in the general population, we did not find any association between smoking and cataract surgery in diabetic patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Department of Ophthalmology, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, China.Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Eye Center, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Eye Institute of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Lei.zhang1@monash.edu. Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Lei.zhang1@monash.edu. Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Lei.zhang1@monash.edu. Department of epidemiology, School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China. Lei.zhang1@monash.edu.State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. mingguang.he@unimelb.edu.au. Centre for Eye Research Australia; Ophthalmology, Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. mingguang.he@unimelb.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31399704

Citation

Han, Xiaotong, et al. "Are Smoking Intensity and Cessation Related to Cataract Surgical Risk in Diabetic Patients? Findings From the 45 and Up Study." Eye (London, England), 2019.
Han X, Wu C, Yan X, et al. Are smoking intensity and cessation related to cataract surgical risk in diabetic patients? Findings from the 45 and Up Study. Eye (Lond). 2019.
Han, X., Wu, C., Yan, X., Keel, S., Shang, X., Zhang, L., & He, M. (2019). Are smoking intensity and cessation related to cataract surgical risk in diabetic patients? Findings from the 45 and Up Study. Eye (London, England), doi:10.1038/s41433-019-0550-8.
Han X, et al. Are Smoking Intensity and Cessation Related to Cataract Surgical Risk in Diabetic Patients? Findings From the 45 and Up Study. Eye (Lond). 2019 Aug 9; PubMed PMID: 31399704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are smoking intensity and cessation related to cataract surgical risk in diabetic patients? Findings from the 45 and Up Study. AU - Han,Xiaotong, AU - Wu,Changfan, AU - Yan,Xixi, AU - Keel,Stuart, AU - Shang,Xianwen, AU - Zhang,Lei, AU - He,Mingguang, Y1 - 2019/08/09/ PY - 2018/11/03/received PY - 2019/07/26/accepted PY - 2019/07/07/revised PY - 2019/8/11/entrez JF - Eye (London, England) JO - Eye (Lond) N2 - OBJECTIVES: To investigate if smoking was related to the risk of cataract surgery in diabetic patients. METHODS: A total of 9578 diabetic participants aged 45-65 years were enrolled from the 45 and Up Study, the largest population-based cohort study in Australia. Baseline questionnaire data were linked to the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) database, which were both available from 2004 to 2016. Cataract surgery was determined according to the MBS. Smoking status were assessed by questionnaire. Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between smoking and incidence of cataract surgery during the follow-up. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 995 participants underwent cataract surgery with a corresponding incidence of 12.4 cases per 1000 person-years. In all, 10.8% of participants were current smokers at baseline, 38.7% were former smokers, and 50.5% were never smokers. The incidence of cataract surgery was non-significantly higher in never-smoker compared to former or current smokers. Regression analysis showed no significant difference in cataract surgical risk among former, current, and never smokers. In addition, neither time since quitting of smoking nor age at quitting was associated with the risk of cataract surgery, although there was a marginally significant trend in a lower risk of cataract surgery with longer smoking cessation time for participant with normal weight (P for trend = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Despite that smoking was found to be related to the cataract and cataract surgery in the general population, we did not find any association between smoking and cataract surgery in diabetic patients. SN - 1476-5454 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31399704/Are_smoking_intensity_and_cessation_related_to_cataract_surgical_risk_in_diabetic_patients_Findings_from_the_45_and_Up_Study L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41433-019-0550-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -