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Effects of wearable power assist device on low back fatigue during repetitive lifting tasks.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A wearable power assist device was developed to reduce the stress on the lower back by using pneumatic muscles. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the assist device could reduce the activity or fatigue of lower back muscles during a repetitive lifting task.

METHODS

Twelve male subjects participated in the study. Electromyography of the thoracic erector spinae at the T9 level and lumbar erector spinae at the L3 level was recorded during 90 lifts in 15 min. Subjects' heart rate and Borg's Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale score were recorded during lifting sessions.

FINDINGS

The electromyography amplitude of thoracic erector spinae and lumbar erector spinae was only increased by 32.45% and 40.17%, respectively, when the wearable power assist device was used when comparing the pre- and post-lifting task. Whereas it was increased by 125.78% and 85.90%, respectively, when the wearable power assist device was not used. The decrease in electromyography median frequency from the start until the end of the lifting session was significantly lower when wearing the assist device for the thoracic erector spinae (2.72% vs 7.45%) and the lumbar erector spinae (3.91% vs 13.70%). Use of the assist device also significantly reduced the percentage change in heart rate and Borg Scale (p < 0.05).

INTERPRETATION

The use of the wearable power assist device showed less back muscle contraction compared to the no-use, which can potentially minimize the level of back muscle fatigue across the lifting session.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China.School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China; Intelligent Technology R&D Center, Guangzhou Hyetone Mechanical and Electrical Equipment Co., Ltd., Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.Bert S. Turner Department of Construction Management, Louisiana State University, 3315D Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA; Industrial Assessment Center, Louisiana State University, 3131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.. Electronic address: chaowang@lsu.edu.School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China. Electronic address: qusg@scut.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31401531

Citation

Yin, Peng, et al. "Effects of Wearable Power Assist Device On Low Back Fatigue During Repetitive Lifting Tasks." Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), vol. 70, 2019, pp. 59-65.
Yin P, Yang L, Wang C, et al. Effects of wearable power assist device on low back fatigue during repetitive lifting tasks. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2019;70:59-65.
Yin, P., Yang, L., Wang, C., & Qu, S. (2019). Effects of wearable power assist device on low back fatigue during repetitive lifting tasks. Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), 70, pp. 59-65. doi:10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.07.023.
Yin P, et al. Effects of Wearable Power Assist Device On Low Back Fatigue During Repetitive Lifting Tasks. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2019 Jul 24;70:59-65. PubMed PMID: 31401531.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of wearable power assist device on low back fatigue during repetitive lifting tasks. AU - Yin,Peng, AU - Yang,Liang, AU - Wang,Chao, AU - Qu,Shengguan, Y1 - 2019/07/24/ PY - 2018/09/30/received PY - 2019/07/13/revised PY - 2019/07/23/accepted PY - 2019/8/12/pubmed PY - 2019/8/12/medline PY - 2019/8/12/entrez KW - Assist device KW - Electromyography KW - Low back pain KW - Muscle fatigue KW - Repetitive lifting SP - 59 EP - 65 JF - Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon) JO - Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) VL - 70 N2 - BACKGROUND: A wearable power assist device was developed to reduce the stress on the lower back by using pneumatic muscles. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the assist device could reduce the activity or fatigue of lower back muscles during a repetitive lifting task. METHODS: Twelve male subjects participated in the study. Electromyography of the thoracic erector spinae at the T9 level and lumbar erector spinae at the L3 level was recorded during 90 lifts in 15 min. Subjects' heart rate and Borg's Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale score were recorded during lifting sessions. FINDINGS: The electromyography amplitude of thoracic erector spinae and lumbar erector spinae was only increased by 32.45% and 40.17%, respectively, when the wearable power assist device was used when comparing the pre- and post-lifting task. Whereas it was increased by 125.78% and 85.90%, respectively, when the wearable power assist device was not used. The decrease in electromyography median frequency from the start until the end of the lifting session was significantly lower when wearing the assist device for the thoracic erector spinae (2.72% vs 7.45%) and the lumbar erector spinae (3.91% vs 13.70%). Use of the assist device also significantly reduced the percentage change in heart rate and Borg Scale (p < 0.05). INTERPRETATION: The use of the wearable power assist device showed less back muscle contraction compared to the no-use, which can potentially minimize the level of back muscle fatigue across the lifting session. SN - 1879-1271 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31401531/Effects_of_wearable_power_assist_device_on_low_back_fatigue_during_repetitive_lifting_tasks L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0268-0033(18)30814-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -