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A comparative multi-site and whole-body assessment of fascia in the horse and dog: a detailed histological investigation.
J Anat 2019; 235(6):1065-1077JA

Abstract

Fascia in the veterinary sciences is drawing attention, such that physiotherapists and animal practitioners are now applying techniques based on the concept of fascia studies in humans. A comprehensive study of fascia is therefore needed in animals to understand the arrangement of the fascial layers in an unguligrade horse and a digitigrade dog. This study has examined the difference between the horse and the dog fascia at specific regions, in terms of histology, and has compared it with the human model. Histological examinations show that in general the fascia tissue of the horse exhibits a tight and dense composition, while in the dog it is looser and has non-dense structure. Indeed, equine fascia appears to be different from both canine fascia and the human fascia model, whilst canine fascia is very comparable to the human model. Although regional variations were observed, the superficial fascia (fascia superficialis) in the horse was found to be trilaminar in the trunk, yet multilayered in the dog. Moreover, crimping of collagen fibers was more visible in the horse than the dog. Blood vessels and nerves were present in the loose areolar tissue of the superficial and the profound compartment of hypodermis. The deep fascia (fascia profunda) in the horse was thick and tightly attached to the underlying muscle, while in the dog the deep fascia was thin and loosely attached to underlying structures. Superficial and deep fascia fused in the extremities. In conclusion, gross dissection and histology have revealed species variations that are related to the absence or presence of the superficial adipose tissue, the retinacula cutis superficialis, the localization and amount of elastic fibers, as well as the ability to slide and glide between the different layers. Further research is now needed to understand in more detail whether these differences have an influence on the biomechanics, movements and proprioception of these animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Equi-Physiq, Tikøb, Denmark.Move in Harmony, Birkerød, Denmark.Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31402460

Citation

Ahmed, Waqas, et al. "A Comparative Multi-site and Whole-body Assessment of Fascia in the Horse and Dog: a Detailed Histological Investigation." Journal of Anatomy, vol. 235, no. 6, 2019, pp. 1065-1077.
Ahmed W, Kulikowska M, Ahlmann T, et al. A comparative multi-site and whole-body assessment of fascia in the horse and dog: a detailed histological investigation. J Anat. 2019;235(6):1065-1077.
Ahmed, W., Kulikowska, M., Ahlmann, T., Berg, L. C., Harrison, A. P., & Elbrønd, V. S. (2019). A comparative multi-site and whole-body assessment of fascia in the horse and dog: a detailed histological investigation. Journal of Anatomy, 235(6), pp. 1065-1077. doi:10.1111/joa.13064.
Ahmed W, et al. A Comparative Multi-site and Whole-body Assessment of Fascia in the Horse and Dog: a Detailed Histological Investigation. J Anat. 2019;235(6):1065-1077. PubMed PMID: 31402460.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparative multi-site and whole-body assessment of fascia in the horse and dog: a detailed histological investigation. AU - Ahmed,Waqas, AU - Kulikowska,Marta, AU - Ahlmann,Trine, AU - Berg,Lise C, AU - Harrison,Adrian P, AU - Elbrønd,Vibeke Sødring, Y1 - 2019/08/11/ PY - 2019/06/27/accepted PY - 2019/8/14/pubmed PY - 2019/8/14/medline PY - 2019/8/13/entrez KW - deep fascia KW - dog KW - histology KW - horse KW - hypodermis KW - myofascial kinetic lines KW - superficial fascia SP - 1065 EP - 1077 JF - Journal of anatomy JO - J. Anat. VL - 235 IS - 6 N2 - Fascia in the veterinary sciences is drawing attention, such that physiotherapists and animal practitioners are now applying techniques based on the concept of fascia studies in humans. A comprehensive study of fascia is therefore needed in animals to understand the arrangement of the fascial layers in an unguligrade horse and a digitigrade dog. This study has examined the difference between the horse and the dog fascia at specific regions, in terms of histology, and has compared it with the human model. Histological examinations show that in general the fascia tissue of the horse exhibits a tight and dense composition, while in the dog it is looser and has non-dense structure. Indeed, equine fascia appears to be different from both canine fascia and the human fascia model, whilst canine fascia is very comparable to the human model. Although regional variations were observed, the superficial fascia (fascia superficialis) in the horse was found to be trilaminar in the trunk, yet multilayered in the dog. Moreover, crimping of collagen fibers was more visible in the horse than the dog. Blood vessels and nerves were present in the loose areolar tissue of the superficial and the profound compartment of hypodermis. The deep fascia (fascia profunda) in the horse was thick and tightly attached to the underlying muscle, while in the dog the deep fascia was thin and loosely attached to underlying structures. Superficial and deep fascia fused in the extremities. In conclusion, gross dissection and histology have revealed species variations that are related to the absence or presence of the superficial adipose tissue, the retinacula cutis superficialis, the localization and amount of elastic fibers, as well as the ability to slide and glide between the different layers. Further research is now needed to understand in more detail whether these differences have an influence on the biomechanics, movements and proprioception of these animals. SN - 1469-7580 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31402460/A_comparative_multi-site_and_whole-body_assessment_of_fascia_in_the_horse_and_dog:_a_detailed_histological_investigation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.13064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -