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The Influence of Smoking Status on the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men.
J Am Geriatr Soc 2019; 67(S3):S577-S583JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the influence of smoking status on the health profiles of community-dwelling older Chinese American men in the greater Chicago, IL, area.

DESIGN

This study utilized a cross-sectional study design to analyze data obtained from the larger Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE).

SETTING

A population-based study conducted in Chicago.

PARTICIPANTS

Baseline data from Chinese American men who participated in PINE (N = 1492).

MEASURES

Demographic characteristics measured included age, education years, marital status, income, health insurance coverage, and smoking pack-years. Self-reported smoking status included never smoker, current smoker, and former smoker. Health profile indicators included perceived health status, past 12-month changes in health, chronic medical conditions (heart diseases, stroke, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, thyroid disease, and osteoarthritis), quality of life, and depression and anxiety.

RESULTS

The mean age of the study sample was 72.5 years. Of the sample, 65% reported a smoking history, with 25.1% current smokers and 40.1% former smokers. Current smokers were younger, less educated, and uninsured. Former smokers had the poorest overall health profiles. Compared to former smokers, current smokers were less likely to have heart disease (odds ratio [OR] = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39-0.90), hypertension (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.41-0.72), high cholesterol (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.56-0.99), thyroid disease (OR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.21-0.90), depression (rate ratio [RR] = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.58-0.99), and anxiety (RR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.59-0.89), and they had fewer overall chronic medical conditions (RR = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.70-0.88) after controlling for demographic factors and smoking pack-year history. Compared to never smokers, former and current smokers reported poorer self-rated health (OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.11-2.26) and lower perceived quality of life (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.04-4.29).

CONCLUSIONS

Consistent with prior research, smoking rates were elevated among this sample of older Chinese men. Counter to study hypotheses, former smokers had worse overall health. Study findings suggest the need for health promotion interventions for both current and former smokers. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S577-S583, 2019.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Systems Management, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois.Department of Health Systems Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.Rutgers Biomedical Health Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31403203

Citation

Li, Chien-Ching, et al. "The Influence of Smoking Status On the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 67, no. S3, 2019, pp. S577-S583.
Li CC, Matthews AK, Dong X, et al. The Influence of Smoking Status on the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019;67(S3):S577-S583.
Li, C. C., Matthews, A. K., Dong, X., & Simon, M. (2019). The Influence of Smoking Status on the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 67(S3), pp. S577-S583. doi:10.1111/jgs.15889.
Li CC, et al. The Influence of Smoking Status On the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019;67(S3):S577-S583. PubMed PMID: 31403203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Influence of Smoking Status on the Health Profiles of Older Chinese American Men. AU - Li,Chien-Ching, AU - Matthews,Alicia K, AU - Dong,XinQi, AU - Simon,Melissa, PY - 2018/08/31/received PY - 2019/02/06/revised PY - 2019/02/22/accepted PY - 2019/8/13/entrez KW - Chinese American KW - PINE KW - health profile KW - older adults KW - smoking SP - S577 EP - S583 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 67 IS - S3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of smoking status on the health profiles of community-dwelling older Chinese American men in the greater Chicago, IL, area. DESIGN: This study utilized a cross-sectional study design to analyze data obtained from the larger Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE). SETTING: A population-based study conducted in Chicago. PARTICIPANTS: Baseline data from Chinese American men who participated in PINE (N = 1492). MEASURES: Demographic characteristics measured included age, education years, marital status, income, health insurance coverage, and smoking pack-years. Self-reported smoking status included never smoker, current smoker, and former smoker. Health profile indicators included perceived health status, past 12-month changes in health, chronic medical conditions (heart diseases, stroke, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, thyroid disease, and osteoarthritis), quality of life, and depression and anxiety. RESULTS: The mean age of the study sample was 72.5 years. Of the sample, 65% reported a smoking history, with 25.1% current smokers and 40.1% former smokers. Current smokers were younger, less educated, and uninsured. Former smokers had the poorest overall health profiles. Compared to former smokers, current smokers were less likely to have heart disease (odds ratio [OR] = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.39-0.90), hypertension (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.41-0.72), high cholesterol (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.56-0.99), thyroid disease (OR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.21-0.90), depression (rate ratio [RR] = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.58-0.99), and anxiety (RR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.59-0.89), and they had fewer overall chronic medical conditions (RR = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.70-0.88) after controlling for demographic factors and smoking pack-year history. Compared to never smokers, former and current smokers reported poorer self-rated health (OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.11-2.26) and lower perceived quality of life (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.04-4.29). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with prior research, smoking rates were elevated among this sample of older Chinese men. Counter to study hypotheses, former smokers had worse overall health. Study findings suggest the need for health promotion interventions for both current and former smokers. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S577-S583, 2019. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31403203/The_Influence_of_Smoking_Status_on_the_Health_Profiles_of_Older_Chinese_American_Men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15889 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -