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"Nobody knows, or seems to know how rheumatology and breastfeeding works": Women's experiences of breastfeeding whilst managing a long-term limiting condition - A qualitative visual methods study.
Midwifery. 2019 Nov; 78:91-96.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Only around 1% of babies in the UK are breastfed exclusively until six months of age as recommended by the World Health Organisation. One in ten women who have recently given birth in the UK have a long-term illness and they are at increased risk of stopping breastfeeding early. We considered women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases as an exemplar group of long term illnesses, to explore the barriers and enablers to breastfeeding AIM: To understand the experiences of infant feeding among women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to identify potential barriers and enablers.

DESIGN

Qualitative visual timeline-facilitated interviews.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING

128 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases who were considering pregnancy, pregnant, or had young children took part in an online survey as part of the STAR Family Study. Of these, 13 women who had children were purposefully sampled to be interviewed. Interviews took place in person or on the telephone. Timeline-facilitated interviews were used to focus on lived experiences and topics important to the women, including early parenting. We conducted a focused thematic analysis of women's lived experiences of infant feeding.

RESULTS

Three main themes were identified in relation to breastfeeding: lack of information about medication safety, lack of support in decision-making and maintaining breastfeeding, and maternal guilt.

CONCLUSIONS

Women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases found it difficult to access the information they needed about medications to make informed decisions about breastfeeding. They often also felt pressurised into breastfeeding and experienced feelings of guilt if they were unable, or did not wish to breastfeed. Tailored interventions are required that adopt a non-judgmental and person-centred approach to support decision-making in regard to infant feeding, providing women with information that can best enable them to make infant feeding choices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. Electronic address: stoilovado@cardiff.ac.uk.Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Centre for Medical Education, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31404778

Citation

Williams, Denitza, et al. ""Nobody Knows, or Seems to Know How Rheumatology and Breastfeeding Works": Women's Experiences of Breastfeeding Whilst Managing a Long-term Limiting Condition - a Qualitative Visual Methods Study." Midwifery, vol. 78, 2019, pp. 91-96.
Williams D, Webber J, Pell B, et al. "Nobody knows, or seems to know how rheumatology and breastfeeding works": Women's experiences of breastfeeding whilst managing a long-term limiting condition - A qualitative visual methods study. Midwifery. 2019;78:91-96.
Williams, D., Webber, J., Pell, B., Grant, A., Sanders, J., Choy, E., Edwards, A., Taylor, A., Wu, M. C., & Phillips, R. (2019). "Nobody knows, or seems to know how rheumatology and breastfeeding works": Women's experiences of breastfeeding whilst managing a long-term limiting condition - A qualitative visual methods study. Midwifery, 78, 91-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2019.08.002
Williams D, et al. "Nobody Knows, or Seems to Know How Rheumatology and Breastfeeding Works": Women's Experiences of Breastfeeding Whilst Managing a Long-term Limiting Condition - a Qualitative Visual Methods Study. Midwifery. 2019;78:91-96. PubMed PMID: 31404778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - "Nobody knows, or seems to know how rheumatology and breastfeeding works": Women's experiences of breastfeeding whilst managing a long-term limiting condition - A qualitative visual methods study. AU - Williams,Denitza, AU - Webber,Jessica, AU - Pell,Bethan, AU - Grant,Aimee, AU - Sanders,Julia, AU - Choy,Ernest, AU - Edwards,Adrian, AU - Taylor,Ann, AU - Wu,Meng-Chieh, AU - Phillips,Rhiannon, Y1 - 2019/08/06/ PY - 2019/03/21/received PY - 2019/08/02/revised PY - 2019/08/04/accepted PY - 2019/8/14/pubmed PY - 2020/3/3/medline PY - 2019/8/13/entrez KW - Autoimmune rheumatic disease KW - Breastfeeding KW - Disability KW - Long-term illness KW - Qualitative KW - Shared decision-making KW - Time-lining KW - Timeline-facilitated interview KW - Visual methods SP - 91 EP - 96 JF - Midwifery JO - Midwifery VL - 78 N2 - BACKGROUND: Only around 1% of babies in the UK are breastfed exclusively until six months of age as recommended by the World Health Organisation. One in ten women who have recently given birth in the UK have a long-term illness and they are at increased risk of stopping breastfeeding early. We considered women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases as an exemplar group of long term illnesses, to explore the barriers and enablers to breastfeeding AIM: To understand the experiences of infant feeding among women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to identify potential barriers and enablers. DESIGN: Qualitative visual timeline-facilitated interviews. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 128 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases who were considering pregnancy, pregnant, or had young children took part in an online survey as part of the STAR Family Study. Of these, 13 women who had children were purposefully sampled to be interviewed. Interviews took place in person or on the telephone. Timeline-facilitated interviews were used to focus on lived experiences and topics important to the women, including early parenting. We conducted a focused thematic analysis of women's lived experiences of infant feeding. RESULTS: Three main themes were identified in relation to breastfeeding: lack of information about medication safety, lack of support in decision-making and maintaining breastfeeding, and maternal guilt. CONCLUSIONS: Women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases found it difficult to access the information they needed about medications to make informed decisions about breastfeeding. They often also felt pressurised into breastfeeding and experienced feelings of guilt if they were unable, or did not wish to breastfeed. Tailored interventions are required that adopt a non-judgmental and person-centred approach to support decision-making in regard to infant feeding, providing women with information that can best enable them to make infant feeding choices. SN - 1532-3099 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31404778/"Nobody_knows_or_seems_to_know_how_rheumatology_and_breastfeeding_works":_Women's_experiences_of_breastfeeding_whilst_managing_a_long_term_limiting_condition___A_qualitative_visual_methods_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0266-6138(19)30206-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -