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'I'm never going to change unless someone tells me I need to': fostering feedback dialogue between general practice supervisors and registrars.
Aust J Prim Health. 2019 Oct; 25(4):374-379.AJ

Abstract

Feedback is often unidirectional and focused on learners receiving feedback. Learning relationships are viewed as influential to promoting feedback dialogue. The aim of this study was to explore factors that facilitate or impede feedback between general practice supervisors and registrars. An in-depth qualitative study was conducted. Data collection featured semistructured interviews with registrars (n = 9) and supervisors (n = 5). Interviews were audio recorded and analysed interpretatively. Feedback was affected by personal (i.e. resilience, humility), relational (i.e. strength of supervisory relationship, power differentials) and contextual (i.e. culture) factors. Registrars are not accustomed to providing feedback and supervisors do not typically request feedback. Past feedback experiences affect registrar engagement in feedback exchanges. A culture of feedback dialogue within training organisations and training practices is essential. Power imbalance needs to be addressed, particularly for feedback by registrars. Strategies to develop feedback skills and promote an open feedback culture are essential.

Authors+Show Affiliations

EV GP Training (EVGPT), Suite B2, 50 Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia; and Corresponding author. Email: bianca_denny@me.com.EV GP Training (EVGPT), Suite B2, 50 Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia.EV GP Training (EVGPT), Suite B2, 50 Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia.EV GP Training (EVGPT), Suite B2, 50 Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia.EV GP Training (EVGPT), Suite B2, 50 Northways Road, Churchill, Vic. 3842, Australia.Monash Institute for Health and Clinical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, 27 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, Vic. 3168, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31405450

Citation

Denny, Bianca, et al. "'I'm Never Going to Change Unless Someone Tells Me I Need To': Fostering Feedback Dialogue Between General Practice Supervisors and Registrars." Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 25, no. 4, 2019, pp. 374-379.
Denny B, Brown J, Kirby C, et al. 'I'm never going to change unless someone tells me I need to': fostering feedback dialogue between general practice supervisors and registrars. Aust J Prim Health. 2019;25(4):374-379.
Denny, B., Brown, J., Kirby, C., Garth, B., Chesters, J., & Nestel, D. (2019). 'I'm never going to change unless someone tells me I need to': fostering feedback dialogue between general practice supervisors and registrars. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 25(4), 374-379. https://doi.org/10.1071/PY19037
Denny B, et al. 'I'm Never Going to Change Unless Someone Tells Me I Need To': Fostering Feedback Dialogue Between General Practice Supervisors and Registrars. Aust J Prim Health. 2019;25(4):374-379. PubMed PMID: 31405450.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 'I'm never going to change unless someone tells me I need to': fostering feedback dialogue between general practice supervisors and registrars. AU - Denny,Bianca, AU - Brown,James, AU - Kirby,Catherine, AU - Garth,Belinda, AU - Chesters,Janice, AU - Nestel,Debra, PY - 2019/02/06/received PY - 2019/05/19/accepted PY - 2019/8/14/pubmed PY - 2019/8/14/medline PY - 2019/8/14/entrez SP - 374 EP - 379 JF - Australian journal of primary health JO - Aust J Prim Health VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - Feedback is often unidirectional and focused on learners receiving feedback. Learning relationships are viewed as influential to promoting feedback dialogue. The aim of this study was to explore factors that facilitate or impede feedback between general practice supervisors and registrars. An in-depth qualitative study was conducted. Data collection featured semistructured interviews with registrars (n = 9) and supervisors (n = 5). Interviews were audio recorded and analysed interpretatively. Feedback was affected by personal (i.e. resilience, humility), relational (i.e. strength of supervisory relationship, power differentials) and contextual (i.e. culture) factors. Registrars are not accustomed to providing feedback and supervisors do not typically request feedback. Past feedback experiences affect registrar engagement in feedback exchanges. A culture of feedback dialogue within training organisations and training practices is essential. Power imbalance needs to be addressed, particularly for feedback by registrars. Strategies to develop feedback skills and promote an open feedback culture are essential. SN - 1836-7399 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31405450/'I DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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