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Pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption and mortality risk among black women and white women with invasive breast cancer.
BMC Cancer. 2019 Aug 13; 19(1):800.BC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of breast cancer; however, its association with subsequent risk of breast cancer death is unclear.

METHODS

We followed 4523 women with complete information on relevant risk factors for mortality; these women were 35 to 64 years of age when diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer between 1994 and 1998. During follow up (median, 8.6 years), 1055 women died; 824 died from breast cancer. The information on alcohol consumption before diagnosis was collected shortly after breast cancer diagnosis (average: 5.1 months) during an in-person interview which used a structured questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer-specific mortality, mortality due to causes other than breast cancer, and all-cause mortality associated with alcohol consumption from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis and during recent periods of time prior to breast cancer diagnosis.

RESULTS

Average weekly alcohol consumption from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (Ptrend = 0.01). Compared to non-drinkers, women in the highest average weekly alcohol consumption category (≥7 drinks/week) had 25% lower risk of breast cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.56-1.00). Breast cancer mortality risk was also reduced among women in the highest average weekly alcohol consumption category in two recent time periods (5-year period ending 2-years prior to breast cancer diagnosis, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.95; 2-year period immediately prior to breast cancer diagnosis: HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.56-0.95). Furthermore, analyses of average weekly alcohol consumption by beverage type from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis suggested that wine consumption was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality risk (wine Ptrend = 0.06, beer Ptrend = 0.24, liquor Ptrend = 0.74). No association with any of these alcohol consumption variables was observed for mortality risk due to causes other than breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, we found no evidence that alcohol consumption before breast cancer diagnosis increases subsequent risk of death from breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA, 91010, USA. hma@coh.org.Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA.College of Health and Social Services, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA., Atlanta, USA.Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo Norway and Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA.Karmanos Cancer Institute, Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA.Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA, 91010, USA.Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA, 91010, USA.Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA, 91010, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31409314

Citation

Ma, Huiyan, et al. "Pre-diagnosis Alcohol Consumption and Mortality Risk Among Black Women and White Women With Invasive Breast Cancer." BMC Cancer, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 800.
Ma H, Malone KE, McDonald JA, et al. Pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption and mortality risk among black women and white women with invasive breast cancer. BMC Cancer. 2019;19(1):800.
Ma, H., Malone, K. E., McDonald, J. A., Marchbanks, P. A., Ursin, G., Strom, B. L., Simon, M. S., Sullivan-Halley, J., Bernstein, L., & Lu, Y. (2019). Pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption and mortality risk among black women and white women with invasive breast cancer. BMC Cancer, 19(1), 800. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-019-5991-8
Ma H, et al. Pre-diagnosis Alcohol Consumption and Mortality Risk Among Black Women and White Women With Invasive Breast Cancer. BMC Cancer. 2019 Aug 13;19(1):800. PubMed PMID: 31409314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption and mortality risk among black women and white women with invasive breast cancer. AU - Ma,Huiyan, AU - Malone,Kathleen E, AU - McDonald,Jill A, AU - Marchbanks,Polly A, AU - Ursin,Giske, AU - Strom,Brian L, AU - Simon,Michael S, AU - Sullivan-Halley,Jane, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, AU - Lu,Yani, Y1 - 2019/08/13/ PY - 2018/12/11/received PY - 2019/07/29/accepted PY - 2019/8/15/entrez PY - 2019/8/15/pubmed PY - 2020/1/10/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Beer KW - Black women KW - Breast cancer KW - Liquor KW - Mortality KW - White women KW - Wine SP - 800 EP - 800 JF - BMC cancer JO - BMC Cancer VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of breast cancer; however, its association with subsequent risk of breast cancer death is unclear. METHODS: We followed 4523 women with complete information on relevant risk factors for mortality; these women were 35 to 64 years of age when diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer between 1994 and 1998. During follow up (median, 8.6 years), 1055 women died; 824 died from breast cancer. The information on alcohol consumption before diagnosis was collected shortly after breast cancer diagnosis (average: 5.1 months) during an in-person interview which used a structured questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer-specific mortality, mortality due to causes other than breast cancer, and all-cause mortality associated with alcohol consumption from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis and during recent periods of time prior to breast cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: Average weekly alcohol consumption from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (Ptrend = 0.01). Compared to non-drinkers, women in the highest average weekly alcohol consumption category (≥7 drinks/week) had 25% lower risk of breast cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.56-1.00). Breast cancer mortality risk was also reduced among women in the highest average weekly alcohol consumption category in two recent time periods (5-year period ending 2-years prior to breast cancer diagnosis, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.95; 2-year period immediately prior to breast cancer diagnosis: HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.56-0.95). Furthermore, analyses of average weekly alcohol consumption by beverage type from age 15 years until breast cancer diagnosis suggested that wine consumption was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality risk (wine Ptrend = 0.06, beer Ptrend = 0.24, liquor Ptrend = 0.74). No association with any of these alcohol consumption variables was observed for mortality risk due to causes other than breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found no evidence that alcohol consumption before breast cancer diagnosis increases subsequent risk of death from breast cancer. SN - 1471-2407 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31409314/Pre_diagnosis_alcohol_consumption_and_mortality_risk_among_black_women_and_white_women_with_invasive_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12885-019-5991-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -