Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Thermoregulatory adaptations with progressive heat acclimation are predominantly evident in uncompensable, but not compensable, conditions.
J Appl Physiol (1985) 2019; 127(4):1095-1106JA

Abstract

This study assessed whether, notwithstanding lower resting absolute core temperatures, alterations in time-dependent changes in thermoregulatory responses following partial and complete heat acclimation (HA) are only evident during uncompensable heat stress. Eight untrained individuals underwent 8 wk of aerobic training (i.e., partial HA) followed by 6 days of HA in 38°C/65% relative humidity (RH) (i.e., complete HA). On separate days, esophageal temperature (Tes), arm (LSRarm), and back (LSRback) sweat rate, and whole body sweat rate (WBSR) were measured during a 45-min compensable (37°C/30% RH) and 60-min uncompensable (37°C/60% RH) heat stress trial pre-training (PRE-TRN), post-training (POST-TRN), and post-heat acclimation (POST-HA). For compensable heat stress trials, resting Tes was lower POST-TRN (36.74 ± 0.27°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (36.60 ± 0.27°C, P = 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (36.99 ± 0.19°C); however, ΔTes was similar in all trials (PRE-TRN:0.40 ± 0.23°C; POST-TRN:0.42 ± 0.20°C; POST-HA:0.43 ± 0.12°C, P = 0.97). While LSRback was unaltered by HA (P = 0.94), end-exercise LSRarm was higher POST-TRN (0.70 ± 0.14 mg·cm-2·min-1, P < 0.001) and POST-HA (0.75 ± 0.16 mg·cm-2·min-1, P < 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (0.61 ± 0.15 mg·cm-2·min-1). Despite matched evaporative heat balance requirements, steady-state WBSR (31st-45th min) was greater POST-TRN (12.7 ± 1.0 g/min, P = 0.02) and POST-HA (12.9 ± 0.8 g/min, P = 0.004), compared with PRE-TRN (11.7 ± 0.9 g/min). For uncompensable heat stress trials, resting Tes was lower POST-TRN (36.77 ± 0.22°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (36.62 ± 0.15°C, P = 0.03) compared with PRE-TRN (36.86 ± 0.24°C). But ΔTes was smaller POST-TRN (0.77 ± 0.19°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (0.75 ± 0.15°C, P = 0.04) compared with PRE-TRN (1.10 ± 0.32°C). LSRback and LSRarm increased with HA (P < 0.007), supporting the greater WBSR with HA (POST-TRN:14.4 ± 2.4 g/min, P < 0.001; POST-HA:16.8 ± 2.8 g/min, P < 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (12.7 ± 3.2 g/min). In conclusion, the thermal benefits of HA are primarily evident when conditions challenge the physiological capacity to dissipate heat.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that neither partial nor complete heat acclimation alters the change in core temperature during compensable heat stress compared with an unacclimated state, despite a marginally greater whole body sweat rate. However, the greater local and whole body sweat rate with partial and complete heat acclimation reduced the rise in core temperature during 60 min of uncompensable heat stress compared with an unacclimated state, suggesting the improvements in heat dissipation associated with heat acclimation are best observed when the upper physiological limits for evaporative heat loss are challenged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Département de Pharmacologie et Physiologie, Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre, Montreal Heart Institute Research Centre, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Centre for Heart, Lung and Vascular Health, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31414952

Citation

Ravanelli, Nicholas, et al. "Thermoregulatory Adaptations With Progressive Heat Acclimation Are Predominantly Evident in Uncompensable, but Not Compensable, Conditions." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 127, no. 4, 2019, pp. 1095-1106.
Ravanelli N, Coombs G, Imbeault P, et al. Thermoregulatory adaptations with progressive heat acclimation are predominantly evident in uncompensable, but not compensable, conditions. J Appl Physiol. 2019;127(4):1095-1106.
Ravanelli, N., Coombs, G., Imbeault, P., & Jay, O. (2019). Thermoregulatory adaptations with progressive heat acclimation are predominantly evident in uncompensable, but not compensable, conditions. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 127(4), pp. 1095-1106. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00220.2019.
Ravanelli N, et al. Thermoregulatory Adaptations With Progressive Heat Acclimation Are Predominantly Evident in Uncompensable, but Not Compensable, Conditions. J Appl Physiol. 2019 Oct 1;127(4):1095-1106. PubMed PMID: 31414952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thermoregulatory adaptations with progressive heat acclimation are predominantly evident in uncompensable, but not compensable, conditions. AU - Ravanelli,Nicholas, AU - Coombs,Geoff, AU - Imbeault,Pascal, AU - Jay,Ollie, Y1 - 2019/08/15/ PY - 2019/8/16/pubmed PY - 2019/8/16/medline PY - 2019/8/16/entrez KW - adaptation KW - exercise KW - heat KW - sweating KW - thermoregulation SP - 1095 EP - 1106 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 127 IS - 4 N2 - This study assessed whether, notwithstanding lower resting absolute core temperatures, alterations in time-dependent changes in thermoregulatory responses following partial and complete heat acclimation (HA) are only evident during uncompensable heat stress. Eight untrained individuals underwent 8 wk of aerobic training (i.e., partial HA) followed by 6 days of HA in 38°C/65% relative humidity (RH) (i.e., complete HA). On separate days, esophageal temperature (Tes), arm (LSRarm), and back (LSRback) sweat rate, and whole body sweat rate (WBSR) were measured during a 45-min compensable (37°C/30% RH) and 60-min uncompensable (37°C/60% RH) heat stress trial pre-training (PRE-TRN), post-training (POST-TRN), and post-heat acclimation (POST-HA). For compensable heat stress trials, resting Tes was lower POST-TRN (36.74 ± 0.27°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (36.60 ± 0.27°C, P = 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (36.99 ± 0.19°C); however, ΔTes was similar in all trials (PRE-TRN:0.40 ± 0.23°C; POST-TRN:0.42 ± 0.20°C; POST-HA:0.43 ± 0.12°C, P = 0.97). While LSRback was unaltered by HA (P = 0.94), end-exercise LSRarm was higher POST-TRN (0.70 ± 0.14 mg·cm-2·min-1, P < 0.001) and POST-HA (0.75 ± 0.16 mg·cm-2·min-1, P < 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (0.61 ± 0.15 mg·cm-2·min-1). Despite matched evaporative heat balance requirements, steady-state WBSR (31st-45th min) was greater POST-TRN (12.7 ± 1.0 g/min, P = 0.02) and POST-HA (12.9 ± 0.8 g/min, P = 0.004), compared with PRE-TRN (11.7 ± 0.9 g/min). For uncompensable heat stress trials, resting Tes was lower POST-TRN (36.77 ± 0.22°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (36.62 ± 0.15°C, P = 0.03) compared with PRE-TRN (36.86 ± 0.24°C). But ΔTes was smaller POST-TRN (0.77 ± 0.19°C, P = 0.05) and POST-HA (0.75 ± 0.15°C, P = 0.04) compared with PRE-TRN (1.10 ± 0.32°C). LSRback and LSRarm increased with HA (P < 0.007), supporting the greater WBSR with HA (POST-TRN:14.4 ± 2.4 g/min, P < 0.001; POST-HA:16.8 ± 2.8 g/min, P < 0.001) compared with PRE-TRN (12.7 ± 3.2 g/min). In conclusion, the thermal benefits of HA are primarily evident when conditions challenge the physiological capacity to dissipate heat.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that neither partial nor complete heat acclimation alters the change in core temperature during compensable heat stress compared with an unacclimated state, despite a marginally greater whole body sweat rate. However, the greater local and whole body sweat rate with partial and complete heat acclimation reduced the rise in core temperature during 60 min of uncompensable heat stress compared with an unacclimated state, suggesting the improvements in heat dissipation associated with heat acclimation are best observed when the upper physiological limits for evaporative heat loss are challenged. SN - 1522-1601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31414952/Thermoregulatory_adaptations_with_progressive_heat_acclimation_are_predominantly_evident_in_uncompensable_but_not_compensable_conditions_ L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00220.2019?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -