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Body coloration and mechanisms of colour production in Archelosauria: the case of deirocheline turtles.
R Soc Open Sci 2019; 6(7):190319RS

Abstract

Animal body coloration is a complex trait resulting from the interplay of multiple mechanisms. While many studies address the functions of animal coloration, the mechanisms of colour production still remain unknown in most taxa. Here we compare reflectance spectra, cellular, ultra- and nano-structure of colour-producing elements, and pigment types in two freshwater turtles with contrasting courtship behaviour, Trachemys scripta and Pseudemys concinna. The two species differ in the distribution of pigment cell-types and in pigment diversity. We found xanthophores, melanocytes, abundant iridophores and dermal collagen fibres in stripes of both species. The yellow chin and forelimb stripes of both P. concinna and T. scripta contain xanthophores and iridophores, but the post-orbital regions of the two species differ in cell-type distribution. The yellow post-orbital region of P. concinna contains both xanthophores and iridophores, while T. scripta has only xanthophores in the yellow-red postorbital/zygomatic regions. Moreover, in both species, the xanthophores colouring the yellow-red skin contain carotenoids, pterins and riboflavin, but T. scripta has a higher diversity of pigments than P. concinna. Trachemys s. elegans is sexually dichromatic. Differences in the distribution of pigment cell types across body regions in the two species may be related to visual signalling but do not match predictions based on courtship position. Our results demonstrate that archelosaurs share some colour production mechanisms with amphibians and lepidosaurs (i.e. vertical layering/stacking of different pigment cell types and interplay of carotenoids and pterins), but also employ novel mechanisms (i.e. nano-organization of dermal collagen) shared with mammals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Philosophy and History of Science, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Viničná 7, Prague 2, 128 00, Czech Republic. Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, National Museum, Václavské nám. 68, Prague 1, 110 00, Czech Republic. Department of Biophysical Chemistry, J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Dolejškova 3, Prague 8, 18223, Czech Republic.Centro de Conservación de Especies Dulceacuícolas de la Comunidad Valenciana. VAERSA-Generalitat Valenciana, El Palmar, València, 46012, Spain.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, 128 43, Czech Republic.Department of Biology and Medical Genetics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and University Hospital Motol, V Úvalu 84, 150 06 Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, 128 43, Czech Republic.Department of Philosophy and History of Science, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Viničná 7, Prague 2, 128 00, Czech Republic.Department of Food Science, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food, and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague 6, 165 00, Czech Republic.Ethology Lab, Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, University of Valencia, C/ Catedrátic José Beltrán Martinez 2, Paterna, València, 46980, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31417734

Citation

Brejcha, Jindřich, et al. "Body Coloration and Mechanisms of Colour Production in Archelosauria: the Case of Deirocheline Turtles." Royal Society Open Science, vol. 6, no. 7, 2019, p. 190319.
Brejcha J, Bataller JV, Bosáková Z, et al. Body coloration and mechanisms of colour production in Archelosauria: the case of deirocheline turtles. R Soc Open Sci. 2019;6(7):190319.
Brejcha, J., Bataller, J. V., Bosáková, Z., Geryk, J., Havlíková, M., Kleisner, K., ... Font, E. (2019). Body coloration and mechanisms of colour production in Archelosauria: the case of deirocheline turtles. Royal Society Open Science, 6(7), p. 190319. doi:10.1098/rsos.190319.
Brejcha J, et al. Body Coloration and Mechanisms of Colour Production in Archelosauria: the Case of Deirocheline Turtles. R Soc Open Sci. 2019;6(7):190319. PubMed PMID: 31417734.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body coloration and mechanisms of colour production in Archelosauria: the case of deirocheline turtles. AU - Brejcha,Jindřich, AU - Bataller,José Vicente, AU - Bosáková,Zuzana, AU - Geryk,Jan, AU - Havlíková,Martina, AU - Kleisner,Karel, AU - Maršík,Petr, AU - Font,Enrique, Y1 - 2019/07/24/ PY - 2019/02/21/received PY - 2019/06/28/accepted PY - 2019/8/17/entrez PY - 2019/8/17/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline KW - Chelonia KW - Pseudemys concinna KW - Trachemys scripta KW - chromatophores KW - nanostructure KW - pigments SP - 190319 EP - 190319 JF - Royal Society open science JO - R Soc Open Sci VL - 6 IS - 7 N2 - Animal body coloration is a complex trait resulting from the interplay of multiple mechanisms. While many studies address the functions of animal coloration, the mechanisms of colour production still remain unknown in most taxa. Here we compare reflectance spectra, cellular, ultra- and nano-structure of colour-producing elements, and pigment types in two freshwater turtles with contrasting courtship behaviour, Trachemys scripta and Pseudemys concinna. The two species differ in the distribution of pigment cell-types and in pigment diversity. We found xanthophores, melanocytes, abundant iridophores and dermal collagen fibres in stripes of both species. The yellow chin and forelimb stripes of both P. concinna and T. scripta contain xanthophores and iridophores, but the post-orbital regions of the two species differ in cell-type distribution. The yellow post-orbital region of P. concinna contains both xanthophores and iridophores, while T. scripta has only xanthophores in the yellow-red postorbital/zygomatic regions. Moreover, in both species, the xanthophores colouring the yellow-red skin contain carotenoids, pterins and riboflavin, but T. scripta has a higher diversity of pigments than P. concinna. Trachemys s. elegans is sexually dichromatic. Differences in the distribution of pigment cell types across body regions in the two species may be related to visual signalling but do not match predictions based on courtship position. Our results demonstrate that archelosaurs share some colour production mechanisms with amphibians and lepidosaurs (i.e. vertical layering/stacking of different pigment cell types and interplay of carotenoids and pterins), but also employ novel mechanisms (i.e. nano-organization of dermal collagen) shared with mammals. SN - 2054-5703 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31417734/Body_coloration_and_mechanisms_of_colour_production_in_Archelosauria:_the_case_of_deirocheline_turtles L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.190319?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -