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Leading-edge vortices over swept-back wings with varying sweep geometries.
R Soc Open Sci 2019; 6(7):190514RS

Abstract

Micro air vehicles are used in a myriad of applications, such as transportation and surveying. Their performance can be improved through the study of wing designs and lift generation techniques including leading-edge vortices (LEVs). Observation of natural fliers, e.g. birds and bats, has shown that LEVs are a major contributor to lift during flapping flight, and the common swift (Apus apus) has been observed to generate LEVs during gliding flight. We hypothesize that nonlinear swept-back wings generate a vortex in the leading-edge region, which can augment the lift in a similar manner to linear swept-back wings (i.e. delta wing) during gliding flight. Particle image velocimetry experiments were performed in a water flume to compare flow over two wing geometries: one with a nonlinear sweep (swift-like wing) and one with a linear sweep (delta wing). Experiments were performed at three spanwise planes and three angles of attack at a chord-based Reynolds number of 26 000. Streamlines, vorticity, swirling strength, and Q-criterion were used to identify LEVs. The results show similar LEV characteristics for delta and swift-like wing geometries. These similarities suggest that sweep geometries other than a linear sweep (i.e. delta wing) are capable of creating LEVs during gliding flight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Math, Computer Science, and Physics, Roanoke College, Salem, VA, USA.Department of Coastal and Marine Systems Science, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC, USA.Department of Coastal and Marine Systems Science, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC, USA.Department of Coastal and Marine Systems Science, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31417749

Citation

Lambert, William B., et al. "Leading-edge Vortices Over Swept-back Wings With Varying Sweep Geometries." Royal Society Open Science, vol. 6, no. 7, 2019, p. 190514.
Lambert WB, Stanek MJ, Gurka R, et al. Leading-edge vortices over swept-back wings with varying sweep geometries. R Soc Open Sci. 2019;6(7):190514.
Lambert, W. B., Stanek, M. J., Gurka, R., & Hackett, E. E. (2019). Leading-edge vortices over swept-back wings with varying sweep geometries. Royal Society Open Science, 6(7), p. 190514. doi:10.1098/rsos.190514.
Lambert WB, et al. Leading-edge Vortices Over Swept-back Wings With Varying Sweep Geometries. R Soc Open Sci. 2019;6(7):190514. PubMed PMID: 31417749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leading-edge vortices over swept-back wings with varying sweep geometries. AU - Lambert,William B, AU - Stanek,Mathew J, AU - Gurka,Roi, AU - Hackett,Erin E, Y1 - 2019/07/10/ PY - 2018/03/28/received PY - 2019/06/03/accepted PY - 2019/8/17/entrez PY - 2019/8/17/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline KW - delta KW - leading-edge vortex KW - particle image velocimetry KW - swept-back wings KW - swift SP - 190514 EP - 190514 JF - Royal Society open science JO - R Soc Open Sci VL - 6 IS - 7 N2 - Micro air vehicles are used in a myriad of applications, such as transportation and surveying. Their performance can be improved through the study of wing designs and lift generation techniques including leading-edge vortices (LEVs). Observation of natural fliers, e.g. birds and bats, has shown that LEVs are a major contributor to lift during flapping flight, and the common swift (Apus apus) has been observed to generate LEVs during gliding flight. We hypothesize that nonlinear swept-back wings generate a vortex in the leading-edge region, which can augment the lift in a similar manner to linear swept-back wings (i.e. delta wing) during gliding flight. Particle image velocimetry experiments were performed in a water flume to compare flow over two wing geometries: one with a nonlinear sweep (swift-like wing) and one with a linear sweep (delta wing). Experiments were performed at three spanwise planes and three angles of attack at a chord-based Reynolds number of 26 000. Streamlines, vorticity, swirling strength, and Q-criterion were used to identify LEVs. The results show similar LEV characteristics for delta and swift-like wing geometries. These similarities suggest that sweep geometries other than a linear sweep (i.e. delta wing) are capable of creating LEVs during gliding flight. SN - 2054-5703 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31417749/Leading-edge_vortices_over_swept-back_wings_with_varying_sweep_geometries L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsos.190514?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -