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Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) more accurate at detecting mild cognitive impairment than existing short cognitive screening tests? A systematic review of the current literature.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Differentiating normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia is important, as these conditions differ in terms of their prognosis and treatment. Existing short cognitive screening tests vary widely in their accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at detecting MCI and dementia. The Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) was developed in 2012 as a fast and accurate "MCI specific" screening test. The aim of the current study was to conduct a literature review to compare the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the QMCI at differentiating normal cognition, MCI, and dementia to existing short cognitive screening tests at their optimal cut-off scores.

METHODS

A search of the electronic journal databases EBSCO, Psych info, and Science Direct was undertaken using the keywords "Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen," "QMCI," "accuracy," "sensitivity," and "specificity." Results of individual studies were examined, and 2 × 2 tables were drawn up to obtain the overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of each test across the studies included.

RESULTS

Results from individual studies show that the QMCI has higher accuracy at detecting MCI and dementia than these cognitive screens. Pooled analysis shows that it also has greater sensitivity and specificity at optimal cut-off points for each test.

CONCLUSIONS

Based in the current review, the QMCI represents a more accurate, sensitive, and specific screening test for MCI and dementia than the SMMSE or the MoCA. This has important implications in screening for cognitive impairment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychiatry of Old Age, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.Memory Clinic, MISA Building, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.Memory Clinic, MISA Building, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31418473

Citation

Glynn, Kevin, et al. "Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) More Accurate at Detecting Mild Cognitive Impairment Than Existing Short Cognitive Screening Tests? a Systematic Review of the Current Literature." International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2019.
Glynn K, Coen R, Lawlor BA. Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) more accurate at detecting mild cognitive impairment than existing short cognitive screening tests? A systematic review of the current literature. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019.
Glynn, K., Coen, R., & Lawlor, B. A. (2019). Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) more accurate at detecting mild cognitive impairment than existing short cognitive screening tests? A systematic review of the current literature. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, doi:10.1002/gps.5201.
Glynn K, Coen R, Lawlor BA. Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) More Accurate at Detecting Mild Cognitive Impairment Than Existing Short Cognitive Screening Tests? a Systematic Review of the Current Literature. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019 Aug 16; PubMed PMID: 31418473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) more accurate at detecting mild cognitive impairment than existing short cognitive screening tests? A systematic review of the current literature. AU - Glynn,Kevin, AU - Coen,Robert, AU - Lawlor,Brian A, Y1 - 2019/08/16/ PY - 2019/05/13/received PY - 2019/08/11/accepted PY - 2019/8/17/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline PY - 2019/8/17/entrez KW - Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen KW - accuracy KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - sensitivity KW - specificity JF - International journal of geriatric psychiatry JO - Int J Geriatr Psychiatry N2 - OBJECTIVES: Differentiating normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia is important, as these conditions differ in terms of their prognosis and treatment. Existing short cognitive screening tests vary widely in their accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity at detecting MCI and dementia. The Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen (QMCI) was developed in 2012 as a fast and accurate "MCI specific" screening test. The aim of the current study was to conduct a literature review to compare the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the QMCI at differentiating normal cognition, MCI, and dementia to existing short cognitive screening tests at their optimal cut-off scores. METHODS: A search of the electronic journal databases EBSCO, Psych info, and Science Direct was undertaken using the keywords "Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen," "QMCI," "accuracy," "sensitivity," and "specificity." Results of individual studies were examined, and 2 × 2 tables were drawn up to obtain the overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of each test across the studies included. RESULTS: Results from individual studies show that the QMCI has higher accuracy at detecting MCI and dementia than these cognitive screens. Pooled analysis shows that it also has greater sensitivity and specificity at optimal cut-off points for each test. CONCLUSIONS: Based in the current review, the QMCI represents a more accurate, sensitive, and specific screening test for MCI and dementia than the SMMSE or the MoCA. This has important implications in screening for cognitive impairment. SN - 1099-1166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31418473/Is_the_Quick_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_Screen_(QMCI)_more_accurate_at_detecting_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_than_existing_short_cognitive_screening_tests_A_Systematic_review_of_the_current_literature L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.5201 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -