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Analysis of the gut microbiota in alopecia areata: identification of bacterial biomarkers.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alopecia areata is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease with an unknown etiopathogenesis. Gut microbiota has been revealed as a key modulator of systemic immunity.

OBJECTIVE

To determine if patients affected by alopecia universalis present differences in gut bacteria composition compared to healthy controls and investigate possible bacterial biomarkers of the disease.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional study that involved 15 patients affected by alopecia universalis and 15 controls. Gut microbiome of the study subjects was analyzed by sequencing the 16SrRNA of stool samples. We searched for bacterial biomarkers of alopecia universalis using the linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEFse) tool.

RESULTS

In total, 30 study subjects (46.6% female; mean [SD] age, 40.1 [9.8] years) were enrolled. Neither alpha (Shannon diversity index 5.31 ± 0.43 vs. 5.03 ± 0.43, p 0.1) or beta diversity (ADONIS p value: 0.35) of gut microbiota showed statistically significant differences between cases and controls. In patients affected with alopecia, we found an enriched presence (LDA SCORE >2) of Holdemania filiformis, Erysipelotrichacea, Lachnospiraceae, Parabacteroides johnsonii, Clostridiales vadin BB60 group, Bacteroides eggerthii and Parabacteroides distasonis. A predictive model based on the number of bacterial counts of Parabacteroides distasonis and Clostridiales vadin BB60 group correctly predicted disease status in 80% of patients (AUC 0.804 (0.633 - 0.976), p 0.004).

CONCLUSION

Alopecia universalis does not seem to affect broadly gut microbiota structure. Bacterial biomarkers found associated with the disease (Holdemania filiformis, Erysipelotrichacea, Lachnospiraceae, Parabacteroides johnsonii, Eggerthellaceae, Clostridiales vadin BB60 group, Bacteroides eggerthii and Parabacteroides distasonis) should be further studied as they could be involved in its pathophysiology or be used as diagnostic tools. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Dermatology Department. Madrid, Spain.Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Infectious Diseases Department. Madrid, Spain.Department of Genomics and Health, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research of Valencia Region (FISABIO-Public Health), València, Spain. CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBEResp), Madrid, Spain.Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Dermatology Department. Madrid, Spain.Clinica Pedro Jaen. Madrid, Spain.Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Dermatology Department. Madrid, Spain.Department of Genomics and Health, Foundation for the Promotion of Health and Biomedical Research of Valencia Region (FISABIO-Public Health), València, Spain. CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBEResp), Madrid, Spain. Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (I2SysBio), The University of Valencia and The Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)-UVEG), València, Spain.Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Dermatology Department. Madrid, Spain.Ramon y Cajal Hospital. Dermatology Department. Madrid, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31419351

Citation

Moreno-Arrones, Oscar M., et al. "Analysis of the Gut Microbiota in Alopecia Areata: Identification of Bacterial Biomarkers." Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV, 2019.
Moreno-Arrones OM, Serrano-Villar S, Perez-Brocal V, et al. Analysis of the gut microbiota in alopecia areata: identification of bacterial biomarkers. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2019.
Moreno-Arrones, O. M., Serrano-Villar, S., Perez-Brocal, V., Saceda-Corralo, D., Morales-Raya, C., Rodrigues-Barata, R., ... Vano-Galvan, S. (2019). Analysis of the gut microbiota in alopecia areata: identification of bacterial biomarkers. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV, doi:10.1111/jdv.15885.
Moreno-Arrones OM, et al. Analysis of the Gut Microbiota in Alopecia Areata: Identification of Bacterial Biomarkers. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2019 Aug 16; PubMed PMID: 31419351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of the gut microbiota in alopecia areata: identification of bacterial biomarkers. AU - Moreno-Arrones,Oscar M, AU - Serrano-Villar,Sergio, AU - Perez-Brocal,Vicente, AU - Saceda-Corralo,David, AU - Morales-Raya,Carlos, AU - Rodrigues-Barata,Rita, AU - Moya,Andres, AU - Jaen-Olasolo,Pedro, AU - Vano-Galvan,Sergio, Y1 - 2019/08/16/ PY - 2019/8/17/entrez PY - 2019/8/17/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline JF - Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV JO - J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol N2 - BACKGROUND: Alopecia areata is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease with an unknown etiopathogenesis. Gut microbiota has been revealed as a key modulator of systemic immunity. OBJECTIVE: To determine if patients affected by alopecia universalis present differences in gut bacteria composition compared to healthy controls and investigate possible bacterial biomarkers of the disease. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study that involved 15 patients affected by alopecia universalis and 15 controls. Gut microbiome of the study subjects was analyzed by sequencing the 16SrRNA of stool samples. We searched for bacterial biomarkers of alopecia universalis using the linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEFse) tool. RESULTS: In total, 30 study subjects (46.6% female; mean [SD] age, 40.1 [9.8] years) were enrolled. Neither alpha (Shannon diversity index 5.31 ± 0.43 vs. 5.03 ± 0.43, p 0.1) or beta diversity (ADONIS p value: 0.35) of gut microbiota showed statistically significant differences between cases and controls. In patients affected with alopecia, we found an enriched presence (LDA SCORE >2) of Holdemania filiformis, Erysipelotrichacea, Lachnospiraceae, Parabacteroides johnsonii, Clostridiales vadin BB60 group, Bacteroides eggerthii and Parabacteroides distasonis. A predictive model based on the number of bacterial counts of Parabacteroides distasonis and Clostridiales vadin BB60 group correctly predicted disease status in 80% of patients (AUC 0.804 (0.633 - 0.976), p 0.004). CONCLUSION: Alopecia universalis does not seem to affect broadly gut microbiota structure. Bacterial biomarkers found associated with the disease (Holdemania filiformis, Erysipelotrichacea, Lachnospiraceae, Parabacteroides johnsonii, Eggerthellaceae, Clostridiales vadin BB60 group, Bacteroides eggerthii and Parabacteroides distasonis) should be further studied as they could be involved in its pathophysiology or be used as diagnostic tools. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. SN - 1468-3083 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31419351/Analysis_of_the_gut_microbiota_in_alopecia_areata:_identification_of_bacterial_biomarkers L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jdv.15885 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -