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Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment.

Abstract

CONTEXT

Researchers, hospices, and government agencies administer standardized questionnaires to caregivers for assessing end-of-life care quality. Caregiving experiences may influence end-of-life care quality reports, which have implications for caregiver outcomes, and are a clinical and policy priority.

OBJECTIVES

This study aims to determine whether and how caregivers' end-of-life care assessments depend on their burden and benefit perceptions.

METHODS

This study analyzes data from 391 caregivers in the 2011 National Study of Caregiving and their Medicare beneficiary care recipients from the 2011-2016 National Health and Aging Trends Study. Caregivers assessed five end-of-life care aspects for decedents. Logistic regression was used and predicted probabilities of caregivers positively or negatively assessing end-of-life care based on their burden and benefit experiences calculated. Analyses adjusted for caregiver and care recipient demographic and health characteristics.

RESULTS

No or minimal caregiving burden is associated with ≥0.70 probability of caregivers reporting they were always informed about the recipient's condition and that the dying person's care needs were always met, regardless of perceived benefits. High perceived caregiving benefit is associated with ≥0.80 probability of giving such reports, even when perceiving high burden.

CONCLUSION

Caregiver burden and benefit operate alongside one another regarding two end-of-life care evaluations, even when years elapse between caregiver experience reports and care recipient death. This suggests that caregiver interventions reducing burden and bolstering benefits may have a positive and lasting impact on end-of-life care assessments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: eal2003@med.cornell.edu.University of Virginia, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31419541

Citation

Luth, Elizabeth A., and Teja Pristavec. "Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment." Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 2019.
Luth EA, Pristavec T. Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2019.
Luth, E. A., & Pristavec, T. (2019). Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2019.08.012.
Luth EA, Pristavec T. Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2019 Aug 13; PubMed PMID: 31419541.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do Caregiver Experiences Shape End-of-Life Care Perceptions? Burden, Benefits, and Care Quality Assessment. AU - Luth,Elizabeth A, AU - Pristavec,Teja, Y1 - 2019/08/13/ PY - 2019/06/06/received PY - 2019/08/05/revised PY - 2019/08/08/accepted PY - 2019/8/17/pubmed PY - 2019/8/17/medline PY - 2019/8/17/entrez KW - Caregiver benefit KW - National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) KW - National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) KW - caregiver burden KW - end-of-life care JF - Journal of pain and symptom management JO - J Pain Symptom Manage N2 - CONTEXT: Researchers, hospices, and government agencies administer standardized questionnaires to caregivers for assessing end-of-life care quality. Caregiving experiences may influence end-of-life care quality reports, which have implications for caregiver outcomes, and are a clinical and policy priority. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to determine whether and how caregivers' end-of-life care assessments depend on their burden and benefit perceptions. METHODS: This study analyzes data from 391 caregivers in the 2011 National Study of Caregiving and their Medicare beneficiary care recipients from the 2011-2016 National Health and Aging Trends Study. Caregivers assessed five end-of-life care aspects for decedents. Logistic regression was used and predicted probabilities of caregivers positively or negatively assessing end-of-life care based on their burden and benefit experiences calculated. Analyses adjusted for caregiver and care recipient demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS: No or minimal caregiving burden is associated with ≥0.70 probability of caregivers reporting they were always informed about the recipient's condition and that the dying person's care needs were always met, regardless of perceived benefits. High perceived caregiving benefit is associated with ≥0.80 probability of giving such reports, even when perceiving high burden. CONCLUSION: Caregiver burden and benefit operate alongside one another regarding two end-of-life care evaluations, even when years elapse between caregiver experience reports and care recipient death. This suggests that caregiver interventions reducing burden and bolstering benefits may have a positive and lasting impact on end-of-life care assessments. SN - 1873-6513 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31419541/Do_caregiver_experiences_shape_end-of_life_care_perceptions_Burden,_benefits,_and_care_quality_assessment L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0885-3924(19)30458-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -