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Micronutrients decline under long-term tillage and nitrogen fertilization.
Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):12020SR

Abstract

Tillage and nitrogen (N) fertilization can be expected to alter micronutrient dynamics in the soil and in plants over time. However, quantitative information regarding the effects of tillage and N application rates on micronutrient dynamics is limited. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the long-term effect of different tillage methods as well as variation in N application rates on the distribution of Mehlich III extractable manganese, copper, zinc, boron, and iron in soils and (b) to assess accumulation of the same nutrients in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) tissues. The system studied was under a dryland winter wheat-fallow (WW-F) rotation. Tillage methods included moldboard (MP), disk (DP) and sweep (SW), and the N application rates were 0, 45, 90, 135, and 180 kg ha-1. The concentration of soil manganese was greater under DP (131 mg kg-1) than under MP (111 mg kg-1). Inorganic N application reduced extractable soil copper while, it increased manganese accumulation in wheat grain over time. Comparison of micronutrients with adjacent long-term (since 1931) undisturbed grass pasture revealed that the WW-F plots had lost at least 43% and 53% of extractable zinc and copper, respectively, after 75 years of N fertilization and tillage. The results indicate that DP and inorganic N application could reduce the rate of micronutrient decline in soil and winter wheat grain over time compared to MP and no N fertilization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 99164, USA. Department of Crop and Soil Science, 3050 SW Campus Way, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.Department of Crop and Soil Science, 3050 SW Campus Way, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA. Valtcho.jeliazkov@oregonstate.edu.USDA Agricultural Research Service, Columbia Plateau Conservation Research Center, 48037 Tubbs Ranch Rd., Adams, OR, 97810, USA.Department of Crop and Soil Science, 3050 SW Campus Way, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31427679

Citation

Shiwakoti, Santosh, et al. "Micronutrients Decline Under Long-term Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 12020.
Shiwakoti S, Zheljazkov VD, Gollany HT, et al. Micronutrients decline under long-term tillage and nitrogen fertilization. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):12020.
Shiwakoti, S., Zheljazkov, V. D., Gollany, H. T., Kleber, M., & Xing, B. (2019). Micronutrients decline under long-term tillage and nitrogen fertilization. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 12020. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48408-6.
Shiwakoti S, et al. Micronutrients Decline Under Long-term Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization. Sci Rep. 2019 Aug 19;9(1):12020. PubMed PMID: 31427679.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Micronutrients decline under long-term tillage and nitrogen fertilization. AU - Shiwakoti,Santosh, AU - Zheljazkov,Valtcho D, AU - Gollany,Hero T, AU - Kleber,Markus, AU - Xing,Baoshan, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2019/04/11/received PY - 2019/07/26/accepted PY - 2019/8/21/entrez PY - 2019/8/21/pubmed PY - 2019/8/21/medline SP - 12020 EP - 12020 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Tillage and nitrogen (N) fertilization can be expected to alter micronutrient dynamics in the soil and in plants over time. However, quantitative information regarding the effects of tillage and N application rates on micronutrient dynamics is limited. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the long-term effect of different tillage methods as well as variation in N application rates on the distribution of Mehlich III extractable manganese, copper, zinc, boron, and iron in soils and (b) to assess accumulation of the same nutrients in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) tissues. The system studied was under a dryland winter wheat-fallow (WW-F) rotation. Tillage methods included moldboard (MP), disk (DP) and sweep (SW), and the N application rates were 0, 45, 90, 135, and 180 kg ha-1. The concentration of soil manganese was greater under DP (131 mg kg-1) than under MP (111 mg kg-1). Inorganic N application reduced extractable soil copper while, it increased manganese accumulation in wheat grain over time. Comparison of micronutrients with adjacent long-term (since 1931) undisturbed grass pasture revealed that the WW-F plots had lost at least 43% and 53% of extractable zinc and copper, respectively, after 75 years of N fertilization and tillage. The results indicate that DP and inorganic N application could reduce the rate of micronutrient decline in soil and winter wheat grain over time compared to MP and no N fertilization. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31427679/Micronutrients_decline_under_long-term_tillage_and_nitrogen_fertilization L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48408-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -