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Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes among Canadian Adults: Evidence from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition.
Nutrients 2019; 11(8)N

Abstract

As a staple food and dense source of nutrients, milk and alternatives play an important role in nutrient adequacy. The aims of this study were to quantify the consumption of milk and alternatives within Canadian self-selected diets and determine their contribution to intakes of nutrients and energy. First, 24-h dietary recalls from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition were used to assess 1-d food and nutrient intakes among Canadian adults ≥19 y (n = 13,616). Foods were classified as milk and alternatives according to the 2007 Canada's Food Guide. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate daily servings of milk and alternatives by different age groups and demographic characteristics. Population ratios were used to discern their contribution to total intakes of nutrients and energy. Mean daily servings (±SE) were highest for milk (0.60 ± 0.02) and cheese (0.42 ± 0.01), intermediate for frozen dairy (0.16 ± 0.01) and yoghurt (0.14 ± 0.01), and lowest for soy and other dairy (<0.03). Intakes were lowest among Canadians 51+ y (1.3 ± 0.03), females (1.25 ± 0.03), non-Caucasians (1.06 ± 0.05), those with less than a secondary education (1.19 ± 0.05), and British Columbians (1.17 ± 0.05). Milk and alternatives contributed >20% to total intakes of calcium (52.62 ± 0.46%), vitamin D (38.53 ± 0.78%), saturated fat (28.84 ± 0.51%), vitamin B12 (27.73 ± 0.57%), vitamin A (26.16 ± 0.58%), phosphorus (24.76 ± 0.35%), and riboflavin (24.43 ± 0.37%), of which milk was the top source. Milk and alternatives contribute substantially to nutrient intakes and thus warrant further attention in terms of mitigating nutrient inadequacy among the Canadian population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.School of Human Nutrition, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. sergio.burgos@mcgill.ca. Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC H4A 3J1, Canada. sergio.burgos@mcgill.ca. Metabolic Disorders and Complications Program, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC H4A 3J1, Canada. sergio.burgos@mcgill.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31430962

Citation

Auclair, Olivia, et al. "Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes Among Canadian Adults: Evidence From the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 8, 2019.
Auclair O, Han Y, Burgos SA. Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes among Canadian Adults: Evidence from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition. Nutrients. 2019;11(8).
Auclair, O., Han, Y., & Burgos, S. A. (2019). Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes among Canadian Adults: Evidence from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition. Nutrients, 11(8), doi:10.3390/nu11081948.
Auclair O, Han Y, Burgos SA. Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes Among Canadian Adults: Evidence From the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition. Nutrients. 2019 Aug 19;11(8) PubMed PMID: 31430962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of Milk and Alternatives and Their Contribution to Nutrient Intakes among Canadian Adults: Evidence from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition. AU - Auclair,Olivia, AU - Han,Yang, AU - Burgos,Sergio A, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2019/07/12/received PY - 2019/08/07/revised PY - 2019/08/14/accepted PY - 2019/8/22/entrez PY - 2019/8/23/pubmed PY - 2019/8/23/medline KW - Canada’s Food Guide KW - dairy products KW - dietary intake KW - nationally representative survey KW - self-selected diets JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - As a staple food and dense source of nutrients, milk and alternatives play an important role in nutrient adequacy. The aims of this study were to quantify the consumption of milk and alternatives within Canadian self-selected diets and determine their contribution to intakes of nutrients and energy. First, 24-h dietary recalls from the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition were used to assess 1-d food and nutrient intakes among Canadian adults ≥19 y (n = 13,616). Foods were classified as milk and alternatives according to the 2007 Canada's Food Guide. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate daily servings of milk and alternatives by different age groups and demographic characteristics. Population ratios were used to discern their contribution to total intakes of nutrients and energy. Mean daily servings (±SE) were highest for milk (0.60 ± 0.02) and cheese (0.42 ± 0.01), intermediate for frozen dairy (0.16 ± 0.01) and yoghurt (0.14 ± 0.01), and lowest for soy and other dairy (<0.03). Intakes were lowest among Canadians 51+ y (1.3 ± 0.03), females (1.25 ± 0.03), non-Caucasians (1.06 ± 0.05), those with less than a secondary education (1.19 ± 0.05), and British Columbians (1.17 ± 0.05). Milk and alternatives contributed >20% to total intakes of calcium (52.62 ± 0.46%), vitamin D (38.53 ± 0.78%), saturated fat (28.84 ± 0.51%), vitamin B12 (27.73 ± 0.57%), vitamin A (26.16 ± 0.58%), phosphorus (24.76 ± 0.35%), and riboflavin (24.43 ± 0.37%), of which milk was the top source. Milk and alternatives contribute substantially to nutrient intakes and thus warrant further attention in terms of mitigating nutrient inadequacy among the Canadian population. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31430962/Consumption_of_Milk_and_Alternatives_and_Their_Contribution_to_Nutrient_Intakes_among_Canadian_Adults:_Evidence_from_the_2015_Canadian_Community_Health_Survey-Nutrition L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11081948 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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