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Effects of perimenopausal transdermal estradiol on self-reported sleep, independent of its effect on vasomotor symptom bother and depressive symptoms.
Menopause 2019M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of transdermal estradiol (E2) plus intermittent progesterone (EPT) for improving self-reported sleep in perimenopausal women, after controlling for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) bother and depressive symptoms.

METHODS

Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 172 healthy women meeting STRAW+10 criteria for being in the menopausal transition or early postmenopause were randomized to 12 months of transdermal E2 (0.1 mg/d) + 200 mg progesterone (12 d every 3 mo) or placebo. Using standard questionnaires, self-reported sleep, depression, and VMS bother were obtained at baseline and bimonthly postrandomization.

RESULTS

Controlling for baseline levels, EPT (vs placebo) led to reductions in minutes to fall asleep (estimate = -0.12, P = 0.002) and number of awakenings (estimate = -0.24, P = 0.04) over the 12 months. Controlling for changes in VMS bother and depressive symptoms, EPT still predicted reductions in minutes to fall asleep (estimate = -0.28, P = 0.02) and number of awakenings (estimate = -0.11, P = 0.02) over the 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

We extend existing research by demonstrating that hormone therapy (HT) in subjective sleep cannot be fully explained by improvements in VMS bother or depressive symptoms. Research to examine the mechanism (s) underlying HT's effects on sleep would have public health significance for perimenopausal women and also advance our general understanding of the pathophysiology of impaired sleep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31433358

Citation

Geiger, Paul J., et al. "Effects of Perimenopausal Transdermal Estradiol On Self-reported Sleep, Independent of Its Effect On Vasomotor Symptom Bother and Depressive Symptoms." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 2019.
Geiger PJ, Eisenlohr-Moul T, Gordon JL, et al. Effects of perimenopausal transdermal estradiol on self-reported sleep, independent of its effect on vasomotor symptom bother and depressive symptoms. Menopause. 2019.
Geiger, P. J., Eisenlohr-Moul, T., Gordon, J. L., Rubinow, D. R., & Girdler, S. S. (2019). Effects of perimenopausal transdermal estradiol on self-reported sleep, independent of its effect on vasomotor symptom bother and depressive symptoms. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), doi:10.1097/GME.0000000000001398.
Geiger PJ, et al. Effects of Perimenopausal Transdermal Estradiol On Self-reported Sleep, Independent of Its Effect On Vasomotor Symptom Bother and Depressive Symptoms. Menopause. 2019 Aug 19; PubMed PMID: 31433358.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of perimenopausal transdermal estradiol on self-reported sleep, independent of its effect on vasomotor symptom bother and depressive symptoms. AU - Geiger,Paul J, AU - Eisenlohr-Moul,Tory, AU - Gordon,Jennifer L, AU - Rubinow,David R, AU - Girdler,Susan S, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2019/8/23/pubmed PY - 2019/8/23/medline PY - 2019/8/22/entrez JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of transdermal estradiol (E2) plus intermittent progesterone (EPT) for improving self-reported sleep in perimenopausal women, after controlling for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) bother and depressive symptoms. METHODS: Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 172 healthy women meeting STRAW+10 criteria for being in the menopausal transition or early postmenopause were randomized to 12 months of transdermal E2 (0.1 mg/d) + 200 mg progesterone (12 d every 3 mo) or placebo. Using standard questionnaires, self-reported sleep, depression, and VMS bother were obtained at baseline and bimonthly postrandomization. RESULTS: Controlling for baseline levels, EPT (vs placebo) led to reductions in minutes to fall asleep (estimate = -0.12, P = 0.002) and number of awakenings (estimate = -0.24, P = 0.04) over the 12 months. Controlling for changes in VMS bother and depressive symptoms, EPT still predicted reductions in minutes to fall asleep (estimate = -0.28, P = 0.02) and number of awakenings (estimate = -0.11, P = 0.02) over the 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: We extend existing research by demonstrating that hormone therapy (HT) in subjective sleep cannot be fully explained by improvements in VMS bother or depressive symptoms. Research to examine the mechanism (s) underlying HT's effects on sleep would have public health significance for perimenopausal women and also advance our general understanding of the pathophysiology of impaired sleep. SN - 1530-0374 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31433358/Effects_of_perimenopausal_transdermal_estradiol_on_self-reported_sleep,_independent_of_its_effect_on_vasomotor_symptom_bother_and_depressive_symptoms L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0000000000001398 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -