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Managing menopausal symptoms after cancer.
Climacteric 2019; :1-7C

Abstract

The joint burden of cancer and menopause impacts millions of women globally. This review provides an approach to management of menopausal symptoms after cancer in all settings. This includes an overview of current evidence for both hormonal and non-hormonal treatments for vasomotor symptoms and vaginal dryness after cancer. Systemic menopausal hormone therapy provides symptom control and may be used after most cancers but should be avoided after estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and after some other estrogen-dependent cancers. Non-hormonal therapies have been minimally studied in women after a cancer diagnosis and, where they have been studied, it is usually in women with breast cancer. Non-hormonal methods to manage vasomotor symptoms include cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, clonidine, and gabapentin. Vaginal estrogen may be useful to address vaginal dryness. However, safety data in breast cancer patients are still lacking and there is currently no consensus. Lubricants may also help with pain with sexual activity. Management of menopausal symptoms after cancer may be challenging and should include information about induced menopause and possible symptoms as well as available treatments. Management then requires a holistic and multidisciplinary approach with individualized care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women's Hospital, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia. Department of Medical Education, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women's Hospital, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia. Murdoch Children's Research Institute , Melbourne , Australia. Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women's Hospital, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31433675

Citation

Szabo, R A., et al. "Managing Menopausal Symptoms After Cancer." Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, 2019, pp. 1-7.
Szabo RA, Marino JL, Hickey M. Managing menopausal symptoms after cancer. Climacteric. 2019.
Szabo, R. A., Marino, J. L., & Hickey, M. (2019). Managing menopausal symptoms after cancer. Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, pp. 1-7. doi:10.1080/13697137.2019.1646718.
Szabo RA, Marino JL, Hickey M. Managing Menopausal Symptoms After Cancer. Climacteric. 2019 Aug 21;1-7. PubMed PMID: 31433675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Managing menopausal symptoms after cancer. AU - Szabo,R A, AU - Marino,J L, AU - Hickey,M, Y1 - 2019/08/21/ PY - 2019/8/22/entrez KW - Menopause KW - atrophic vaginitis KW - cancer KW - chemotherapy KW - endocrine therapy KW - hormonal therapy KW - menopausal symptoms KW - non-hormonal therapy KW - radiation KW - vasomotor symptoms SP - 1 EP - 7 JF - Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society JO - Climacteric N2 - The joint burden of cancer and menopause impacts millions of women globally. This review provides an approach to management of menopausal symptoms after cancer in all settings. This includes an overview of current evidence for both hormonal and non-hormonal treatments for vasomotor symptoms and vaginal dryness after cancer. Systemic menopausal hormone therapy provides symptom control and may be used after most cancers but should be avoided after estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and after some other estrogen-dependent cancers. Non-hormonal therapies have been minimally studied in women after a cancer diagnosis and, where they have been studied, it is usually in women with breast cancer. Non-hormonal methods to manage vasomotor symptoms include cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, clonidine, and gabapentin. Vaginal estrogen may be useful to address vaginal dryness. However, safety data in breast cancer patients are still lacking and there is currently no consensus. Lubricants may also help with pain with sexual activity. Management of menopausal symptoms after cancer may be challenging and should include information about induced menopause and possible symptoms as well as available treatments. Management then requires a holistic and multidisciplinary approach with individualized care. SN - 1473-0804 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31433675/Managing_menopausal_symptoms_after_cancer L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13697137.2019.1646718 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -