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Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity in SNAP-eligible children and adolescents.
Prim Care Diabetes. 2020 04; 14(2):181-185.PC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Low-income individuals who are eligible for nutrition assistance have been shown to consume a larger portion of their daily calories from beverages with added sugar. We examined the association between Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and self-reported sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption as well as the association between self-reported consumption of SSBs and overweight/obesity in low-income children.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional analysis of 1455 SNAP-eligible U.S. children, ages 2-17, who completed a questionnaire and physical examination during the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

RESULTS

SNAP-eligible children who received SNAP in the last month were more likely to drink soda in the last month [76.0% (2.2)] than those who did not receive benefits [70.5% (2.8)]. These children were also more likely to drink fruit drinks [74.8% (1.6) vs. 69.3% (3.1)]. Among youth in households receiving SNAP benefits, soda consumption in the past month was associated with a greater risk of obesity, particularly Hispanic youth [OR=1.93 (1.07, 3.50), p=0.0314] aged 2-5 [OR=2.71 (1.29, 5.69), p=0.0114]. Additionally, among youth in households receiving SNAP benefits, male children who consumed sugar-sweetened fruit drinks in the past month were significantly more likely to be overweight [3.13 (1.12, 8.73), p=0.0315] as compared to male peers who did not consume any sugar sweetened fruit drinks.

CONCLUSION

Among youth, SNAP recipients drink more SSBs than their eligible non-recipient peers. Our results indicate that certain populations of children receiving SNAP benefits and consuming SSBs are more likely to be overweight or obese when compared to their peers who receive SNAP benefits but do not consume SSBs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: jtwarog2021@nycpm.edu.New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY, USA.New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY, USA.New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31439469

Citation

Twarog, John P., et al. "Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages and Obesity in SNAP-eligible Children and Adolescents." Primary Care Diabetes, vol. 14, no. 2, 2020, pp. 181-185.
Twarog JP, Peraj E, Vaknin OS, et al. Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity in SNAP-eligible children and adolescents. Prim Care Diabetes. 2020;14(2):181-185.
Twarog, J. P., Peraj, E., Vaknin, O. S., Russo, A. T., Woo Baidal, J. A., & Sonneville, K. R. (2020). Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity in SNAP-eligible children and adolescents. Primary Care Diabetes, 14(2), 181-185. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2019.07.003
Twarog JP, et al. Consumption of Sugar-sweetened Beverages and Obesity in SNAP-eligible Children and Adolescents. Prim Care Diabetes. 2020;14(2):181-185. PubMed PMID: 31439469.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and obesity in SNAP-eligible children and adolescents. AU - Twarog,John P, AU - Peraj,Elizabet, AU - Vaknin,Oren S, AU - Russo,Ashley T, AU - Woo Baidal,Jennifer A, AU - Sonneville,Kendrin R, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2019/03/22/received PY - 2019/07/11/revised PY - 2019/07/16/accepted PY - 2019/8/24/pubmed PY - 2019/8/24/medline PY - 2019/8/24/entrez KW - NHANES KW - Obesity KW - SNAP KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages KW - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program SP - 181 EP - 185 JF - Primary care diabetes JO - Prim Care Diabetes VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Low-income individuals who are eligible for nutrition assistance have been shown to consume a larger portion of their daily calories from beverages with added sugar. We examined the association between Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation and self-reported sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption as well as the association between self-reported consumption of SSBs and overweight/obesity in low-income children. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of 1455 SNAP-eligible U.S. children, ages 2-17, who completed a questionnaire and physical examination during the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). RESULTS: SNAP-eligible children who received SNAP in the last month were more likely to drink soda in the last month [76.0% (2.2)] than those who did not receive benefits [70.5% (2.8)]. These children were also more likely to drink fruit drinks [74.8% (1.6) vs. 69.3% (3.1)]. Among youth in households receiving SNAP benefits, soda consumption in the past month was associated with a greater risk of obesity, particularly Hispanic youth [OR=1.93 (1.07, 3.50), p=0.0314] aged 2-5 [OR=2.71 (1.29, 5.69), p=0.0114]. Additionally, among youth in households receiving SNAP benefits, male children who consumed sugar-sweetened fruit drinks in the past month were significantly more likely to be overweight [3.13 (1.12, 8.73), p=0.0315] as compared to male peers who did not consume any sugar sweetened fruit drinks. CONCLUSION: Among youth, SNAP recipients drink more SSBs than their eligible non-recipient peers. Our results indicate that certain populations of children receiving SNAP benefits and consuming SSBs are more likely to be overweight or obese when compared to their peers who receive SNAP benefits but do not consume SSBs. SN - 1878-0210 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31439469/Consumption_of_sugar_sweetened_beverages_and_obesity_in_SNAP_eligible_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1751-9918(19)30079-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -