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The medical relevance of Spirometra tapeworm infection in Indonesian Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus): A neglected zoonotic disease.
Vet World. 2019 Jun; 12(6):844-848.VW

Abstract

Aim

Spirometra parasites cause sparganosis, a zoonotic disease, especially in reptiles and humans. This study aimed to report on the prevalence and effects of Spirometra parasites infection on public health and provide a scientific foundation for its prevention.

Materials and Methods

A total of 378 living Indonesian wild-caught and captive-bred Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus) were selected. The snakes were euthanized using ethyl ether anesthesia before checking for Spirometra parasites. The numbers of Spirometra located in the muscle tissue, subcutaneous tissue, and coelom (including the viscera) were each counted to investigate the distribution of Spirometra inside the snake body cavity.

Results

The total prevalence in the sample was 50.85%. The prevalence values in wild-caught and captive-bred snakes were 70.7% and 48.7%, respectively. More than half (56.6%) of the Spirometra parasites were located in the muscular tissue, while 29.5% were in the subcutaneous tissue and 13.8% were in the coelomic cavity.

Conclusion

Wild-caught Indonesian Bronzeback snakes, which are sold as food in markets, and captive-bred snakes, which are collected as exotic pets in Indonesia, have similar opportunities to transmit the Spirometra parasite and cause global health problems due to their high prevalence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Airlangga University, Indonesia.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Airlangga University, Indonesia.Department of Wildlife Conservation, Education Staff of Mojokerto Reptile and Exotic Animals Community, Indonesia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31440003

Citation

Yudhana, Aditya, et al. "The Medical Relevance of Spirometra Tapeworm Infection in Indonesian Bronzeback Snakes (Dendrelaphis Pictus): a Neglected Zoonotic Disease." Veterinary World, vol. 12, no. 6, 2019, pp. 844-848.
Yudhana A, Praja RN, Supriyanto A. The medical relevance of Spirometra tapeworm infection in Indonesian Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus): A neglected zoonotic disease. Vet World. 2019;12(6):844-848.
Yudhana, A., Praja, R. N., & Supriyanto, A. (2019). The medical relevance of Spirometra tapeworm infection in Indonesian Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus): A neglected zoonotic disease. Veterinary World, 12(6), 844-848. https://doi.org/10.14202/vetworld.2019.844-848
Yudhana A, Praja RN, Supriyanto A. The Medical Relevance of Spirometra Tapeworm Infection in Indonesian Bronzeback Snakes (Dendrelaphis Pictus): a Neglected Zoonotic Disease. Vet World. 2019;12(6):844-848. PubMed PMID: 31440003.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The medical relevance of Spirometra tapeworm infection in Indonesian Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus): A neglected zoonotic disease. AU - Yudhana,Aditya, AU - Praja,Ratih Novita, AU - Supriyanto,Arif, Y1 - 2019/06/18/ PY - 2019/01/04/received PY - 2019/05/03/accepted PY - 2019/8/24/entrez PY - 2019/8/24/pubmed PY - 2019/8/24/medline KW - Dendrelaphis pictus KW - Spirometra KW - sparganosis KW - zoonosis SP - 844 EP - 848 JF - Veterinary world JO - Vet World VL - 12 IS - 6 N2 - Aim: Spirometra parasites cause sparganosis, a zoonotic disease, especially in reptiles and humans. This study aimed to report on the prevalence and effects of Spirometra parasites infection on public health and provide a scientific foundation for its prevention. Materials and Methods: A total of 378 living Indonesian wild-caught and captive-bred Bronzeback snakes (Dendrelaphis pictus) were selected. The snakes were euthanized using ethyl ether anesthesia before checking for Spirometra parasites. The numbers of Spirometra located in the muscle tissue, subcutaneous tissue, and coelom (including the viscera) were each counted to investigate the distribution of Spirometra inside the snake body cavity. Results: The total prevalence in the sample was 50.85%. The prevalence values in wild-caught and captive-bred snakes were 70.7% and 48.7%, respectively. More than half (56.6%) of the Spirometra parasites were located in the muscular tissue, while 29.5% were in the subcutaneous tissue and 13.8% were in the coelomic cavity. Conclusion: Wild-caught Indonesian Bronzeback snakes, which are sold as food in markets, and captive-bred snakes, which are collected as exotic pets in Indonesia, have similar opportunities to transmit the Spirometra parasite and cause global health problems due to their high prevalence. SN - 0972-8988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31440003/The_medical_relevance_of_Spirometra_tapeworm_infection_in_Indonesian_Bronzeback_snakes_(Dendrelaphis_pictus):_A_neglected_zoonotic_disease L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31440003/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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