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Practice trends and the outcome of neuromodulation therapies in epilepsy: A single-center study.
Epilepsia Open 2019; 4(3):493-497EO

Abstract

Neuromodulation therapies (VNS, RNS, and DBS) can improve seizure control in persons with epilepsy. However, there is a significant service gap in integrating these therapies in clinical care. Our epilepsy center has established an epilepsy neuromodulation clinic to improve access to patients, communication with referring physicians, track outcome and train future providers in programming neuromodulation devices. We report the (a) treatment outcome of the available neuromodulation therapies (ie, reduction in seizure frequency over 6-12 months follow-up); and (b) demonstrate the benefit of the specialized clinic (rapid titration, continuity of care, superior access for patient and vendors). In this single-center, retrospective study, forty-three adults (VNS = 27; RNS = 16) with drug-resistant epilepsy were followed in the clinic during the 19 months study period. About 44-69% of patients reported > 60% decrease in seizure. All patients were scheduled in the clinic within 2-4 weeks, and stimulations were optimized rapidly. About 40% of patients participated in research while 28% were referred for additional diagnostic studies. Nineteen students and fellows were trained in programming neurostimulator. Epilepsy neuromodulation clinic can serve as an optimal solution for patients as well as providers due to rapid access, better continuity of care, higher recruitment for research studies, and training health professionals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL.Department of Neurology University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL.Department of Neurology University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL. Epilepsy and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL.Department of Neurology University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL. Epilepsy and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL.Department of Neurology University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL. Epilepsy and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham AL.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31440731

Citation

Jamy, Rabia, et al. "Practice Trends and the Outcome of Neuromodulation Therapies in Epilepsy: a Single-center Study." Epilepsia Open, vol. 4, no. 3, 2019, pp. 493-497.
Jamy R, Kaur M, Pizarro D, et al. Practice trends and the outcome of neuromodulation therapies in epilepsy: A single-center study. Epilepsia Open. 2019;4(3):493-497.
Jamy, R., Kaur, M., Pizarro, D., Toth, E., & Pati, S. (2019). Practice trends and the outcome of neuromodulation therapies in epilepsy: A single-center study. Epilepsia Open, 4(3), pp. 493-497. doi:10.1002/epi4.12345.
Jamy R, et al. Practice Trends and the Outcome of Neuromodulation Therapies in Epilepsy: a Single-center Study. Epilepsia Open. 2019;4(3):493-497. PubMed PMID: 31440731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Practice trends and the outcome of neuromodulation therapies in epilepsy: A single-center study. AU - Jamy,Rabia, AU - Kaur,Manmeet, AU - Pizarro,Diana, AU - Toth,Emilia, AU - Pati,Sandipan, Y1 - 2019/06/11/ PY - 2019/02/20/received PY - 2019/04/18/revised PY - 2019/05/29/accepted PY - 2019/8/24/entrez PY - 2019/8/24/pubmed PY - 2019/8/24/medline KW - deep brain stimulation KW - epilepsy KW - responsive stimulation KW - vagal nerve stimulation SP - 493 EP - 497 JF - Epilepsia open JO - Epilepsia Open VL - 4 IS - 3 N2 - Neuromodulation therapies (VNS, RNS, and DBS) can improve seizure control in persons with epilepsy. However, there is a significant service gap in integrating these therapies in clinical care. Our epilepsy center has established an epilepsy neuromodulation clinic to improve access to patients, communication with referring physicians, track outcome and train future providers in programming neuromodulation devices. We report the (a) treatment outcome of the available neuromodulation therapies (ie, reduction in seizure frequency over 6-12 months follow-up); and (b) demonstrate the benefit of the specialized clinic (rapid titration, continuity of care, superior access for patient and vendors). In this single-center, retrospective study, forty-three adults (VNS = 27; RNS = 16) with drug-resistant epilepsy were followed in the clinic during the 19 months study period. About 44-69% of patients reported > 60% decrease in seizure. All patients were scheduled in the clinic within 2-4 weeks, and stimulations were optimized rapidly. About 40% of patients participated in research while 28% were referred for additional diagnostic studies. Nineteen students and fellows were trained in programming neurostimulator. Epilepsy neuromodulation clinic can serve as an optimal solution for patients as well as providers due to rapid access, better continuity of care, higher recruitment for research studies, and training health professionals. SN - 2470-9239 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31440731/Practice_trends_and_the_outcome_of_neuromodulation_therapies_in_epilepsy:_A_single-center_study DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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