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Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed by the Glycocalyx.
J Clin Med 2019; 8(9)JC

Abstract

Cancer cells can survive and grow via angiogenesis. An alternative but controversial theory is cancer cells may grow via vasculogenic mimicry (VM), in which the cancer cells themselves construct vessel-like channels that are considered a leading cause of drug resistance. The dynamic functions of the glycocalyx (GCX), a meshwork composed of proteoglycans and glycoproteins that surrounds cell membranes, have been observed in endothelial cells within tumors. However, the actual structural shape formed by the GCX in human patients remains unclear. Here, we visualized the three-dimensional (3D) network structure constructed by bulky GCX in human colorectal cancer (CRC) patients using scanning electron microscopy with lanthanum nitrate staining. The network structure extended throughout the cancer cell nest, opening into capillaries, with a tunnel channel that exhibited a net- and spongy-like ultrastructure. The expression of endothelial and cancer-specific GCX-binding lectins was dramatically increased in the interstitial spaces between cancer cells. Even accounting for the presence of artifacts resulting from sample preparation methods, the intercellular tunnels appeared to be coated with the bulky GCX. Further, this 3D network structure was also observed in the tumors of ApcMin/+ mice. In conclusion, the bulky GCX modifies the network structure of CRCs in human and mice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan. Department of Surgical Oncology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan. hideshi@gifu-u.ac.jp.Department of Surgical Oncology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Internal Medicine, Asahi University School of Dentistry, Mizuho 500-8523, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) and Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Surgical Oncology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan.Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu 501-1194, Japan. h_tomita@gifu-u.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31443371

Citation

Tachi, Masahito, et al. "Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed By the Glycocalyx." Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 8, no. 9, 2019.
Tachi M, Okada H, Matsuhashi N, et al. Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed by the Glycocalyx. J Clin Med. 2019;8(9).
Tachi, M., Okada, H., Matsuhashi, N., Takemura, G., Suzuki, K., Fukuda, H., ... Tomita, H. (2019). Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed by the Glycocalyx. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(9), doi:10.3390/jcm8091270.
Tachi M, et al. Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed By the Glycocalyx. J Clin Med. 2019 Aug 22;8(9) PubMed PMID: 31443371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human Colorectal Cancer Infrastructure Constructed by the Glycocalyx. AU - Tachi,Masahito, AU - Okada,Hideshi, AU - Matsuhashi,Nobuhisa, AU - Takemura,Genzou, AU - Suzuki,Kodai, AU - Fukuda,Hirotsugu, AU - Niwa,Ayumi, AU - Tanaka,Takuji, AU - Mori,Hideki, AU - Hara,Akira, AU - Yoshida,Kazuhiro, AU - Ogura,Shinji, AU - Tomita,Hiroyuki, Y1 - 2019/08/22/ PY - 2019/07/22/received PY - 2019/08/14/revised PY - 2019/08/19/accepted PY - 2019/8/25/entrez PY - 2019/8/25/pubmed PY - 2019/8/25/medline KW - angiogenesis KW - colorectal cancer KW - electron microscopy KW - glycocalyx KW - vasculogenic mimicry JF - Journal of clinical medicine JO - J Clin Med VL - 8 IS - 9 N2 - Cancer cells can survive and grow via angiogenesis. An alternative but controversial theory is cancer cells may grow via vasculogenic mimicry (VM), in which the cancer cells themselves construct vessel-like channels that are considered a leading cause of drug resistance. The dynamic functions of the glycocalyx (GCX), a meshwork composed of proteoglycans and glycoproteins that surrounds cell membranes, have been observed in endothelial cells within tumors. However, the actual structural shape formed by the GCX in human patients remains unclear. Here, we visualized the three-dimensional (3D) network structure constructed by bulky GCX in human colorectal cancer (CRC) patients using scanning electron microscopy with lanthanum nitrate staining. The network structure extended throughout the cancer cell nest, opening into capillaries, with a tunnel channel that exhibited a net- and spongy-like ultrastructure. The expression of endothelial and cancer-specific GCX-binding lectins was dramatically increased in the interstitial spaces between cancer cells. Even accounting for the presence of artifacts resulting from sample preparation methods, the intercellular tunnels appeared to be coated with the bulky GCX. Further, this 3D network structure was also observed in the tumors of ApcMin/+ mice. In conclusion, the bulky GCX modifies the network structure of CRCs in human and mice. SN - 2077-0383 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31443371/Human_Colorectal_Cancer_Infrastructure_Constructed_by_the_Glycocalyx L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=jcm8091270 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -