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Tumor biology and multidisciplinary strategies of oligometastasis in gastrointestinal cancers.

Abstract

More than 70% of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are diagnosed with metastases, leading to poor prognosis. For some cancer patients with limited sites of metastatic tumors, the term oligometastatic disease (OMD) has been coined as opposed to systemic polymetastasis (PMD) disease. Stephan Paget first described an organ-specific pattern of metastasis in 1889, now known as the "seed and soil" theory where distinct cancer types are found to metastasize to different tumor-specific sites. Our understanding of the biology of tumor metastasis and specifically the molecular mechanisms driving their formation are still limited, in particular, as it relates to the genesis of oligometastasis. In the following review, we discuss recent advances in general understanding of this metastatic behavior including the role of specific signaling pathways, various molecular features and biomarkers, as well as the interaction of carcinoma cells with their tissue microenvironments (both primary and metastatic niches). The unique features that underlie OMD provide potential targets for localized therapy. As it relates to clinical practice, OMD is emerging as treatable with surgical resection and/or other local therapy options. Strategies currently being applied in the clinical management of OMD will be discussed including surgical, radiation-based therapy, ablation procedures, and the results of emerging clinical trials involving immunotherapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Department of General, Visceral und Vascular Surgery, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany. Electronic address: yue.zhao@uk-koeln.de.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Department of Anethesiology, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University, Shanghai, PR China.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Department of General, Visceral und Vascular Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilian-University (LMU), Munich, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Cytelligen, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany.Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China.Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Center for Integrated Oncology (CIO) Achen, Bonn, Cologne and Düsseldorf, Cologne, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Vascular Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilian-University (LMU), Munich, Germany.Department of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital of Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany.Department of General, Visceral und Tumor Surgery, University Hospital Cologne, Kerpener Straβe 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany; Center for Integrated Oncology (CIO) Achen, Bonn, Cologne and Düsseldorf, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: christiane.bruns@uk-koeln.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31445220

Citation

Zhao, Yue, et al. "Tumor Biology and Multidisciplinary Strategies of Oligometastasis in Gastrointestinal Cancers." Seminars in Cancer Biology, 2019.
Zhao Y, Li J, Li D, et al. Tumor biology and multidisciplinary strategies of oligometastasis in gastrointestinal cancers. Semin Cancer Biol. 2019.
Zhao, Y., Li, J., Li, D., Wang, Z., Zhao, J., Wu, X., ... Bruns, C. J. (2019). Tumor biology and multidisciplinary strategies of oligometastasis in gastrointestinal cancers. Seminars in Cancer Biology, doi:10.1016/j.semcancer.2019.08.026.
Zhao Y, et al. Tumor Biology and Multidisciplinary Strategies of Oligometastasis in Gastrointestinal Cancers. Semin Cancer Biol. 2019 Aug 21; PubMed PMID: 31445220.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tumor biology and multidisciplinary strategies of oligometastasis in gastrointestinal cancers. AU - Zhao,Yue, AU - Li,Jiahui, AU - Li,Dai, AU - Wang,Zhefang, AU - Zhao,Jiangang, AU - Wu,Xiaolin, AU - Sun,Qiye, AU - Lin,Peter Ping, AU - Plum,Patrick, AU - Damanakis,Alexander, AU - Gebauer,Florian, AU - Zhou,Menglong, AU - Zhang,Zhen, AU - Schlösser,Hans, AU - Jauch,Karl-Walter, AU - Nelson,Peter J, AU - Bruns,Christiane J, Y1 - 2019/08/21/ PY - 2019/07/10/received PY - 2019/08/20/accepted PY - 2019/8/25/pubmed PY - 2019/8/25/medline PY - 2019/8/25/entrez KW - Biomarkers KW - Molecular biology KW - Oligometastasis KW - Radiation therapy KW - Surgery JF - Seminars in cancer biology JO - Semin. Cancer Biol. N2 - More than 70% of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are diagnosed with metastases, leading to poor prognosis. For some cancer patients with limited sites of metastatic tumors, the term oligometastatic disease (OMD) has been coined as opposed to systemic polymetastasis (PMD) disease. Stephan Paget first described an organ-specific pattern of metastasis in 1889, now known as the "seed and soil" theory where distinct cancer types are found to metastasize to different tumor-specific sites. Our understanding of the biology of tumor metastasis and specifically the molecular mechanisms driving their formation are still limited, in particular, as it relates to the genesis of oligometastasis. In the following review, we discuss recent advances in general understanding of this metastatic behavior including the role of specific signaling pathways, various molecular features and biomarkers, as well as the interaction of carcinoma cells with their tissue microenvironments (both primary and metastatic niches). The unique features that underlie OMD provide potential targets for localized therapy. As it relates to clinical practice, OMD is emerging as treatable with surgical resection and/or other local therapy options. Strategies currently being applied in the clinical management of OMD will be discussed including surgical, radiation-based therapy, ablation procedures, and the results of emerging clinical trials involving immunotherapy. SN - 1096-3650 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31445220/Tumor_Biology_and_Multidisciplinary_Strategies_of_Oligometastasis_in_Gastrointestinal_Cancers L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1044-579X(19)30173-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -