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Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016.
Nutrients. 2019 Aug 25; 11(9)N

Abstract

Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increases total caloric intake, is linked to cardiometabolic outcomes as well as dental caries, and sugar in SSBs is associated with mortality and frailty among adults. We describe energy and total sugar intake trends among the United States (US) population from SSBs, soft drinks, other beverage groups, and the total diet based on the first 24-h recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles (2003-2004 through 2015-2016). SSBs included soft drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks, and fruit drinks, but excluded sports beverages with protein and sweetened teas/coffees. Among the total population (age ≥2 years: 57,026), energy intake from SSBs declined significantly from 183.9 ± 6.9 mean kcal/d (±SE) in 2003-2004 to 95.0 ± 3.5 in 2015-2016, while total sugar intake declined from 43.6 ± 1.7 mean g/d to 22.3 ± 0.8 (p-trend < 0.0001). Decreases were found for energy and total sugar intake, as well as percentage of energy and total sugar intake from SSBs, soft drinks, and all beverages for all age groups examined (≥2, 2-19, ≥20 years) (p-trend < 0.0001). From 2003 to 2016, energy and sugar intake from all beverages, SSBs, soft drinks, and the total diet decreased among the total population, children, and adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 114 Doughty Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. marriobp@musc.edu. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. marriobp@musc.edu.Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Cannon Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 114 Doughty Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31450689

Citation

Marriott, Bernadette P., et al. "Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar From Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States Among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 9, 2019.
Marriott BP, Hunt KJ, Malek AM, et al. Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016. Nutrients. 2019;11(9).
Marriott, B. P., Hunt, K. J., Malek, A. M., & Newman, J. C. (2019). Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016. Nutrients, 11(9). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092004
Marriott BP, et al. Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar From Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States Among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016. Nutrients. 2019 Aug 25;11(9) PubMed PMID: 31450689.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in Intake of Energy and Total Sugar from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in the United States among Children and Adults, NHANES 2003-2016. AU - Marriott,Bernadette P, AU - Hunt,Kelly J, AU - Malek,Angela M, AU - Newman,Jill C, Y1 - 2019/08/25/ PY - 2019/07/26/received PY - 2019/08/21/revised PY - 2019/08/22/accepted PY - 2019/8/28/entrez PY - 2019/8/28/pubmed PY - 2020/2/11/medline KW - NHANES KW - SSBs KW - adults KW - children KW - energy KW - total sugar KW - trends JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 9 N2 - Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increases total caloric intake, is linked to cardiometabolic outcomes as well as dental caries, and sugar in SSBs is associated with mortality and frailty among adults. We describe energy and total sugar intake trends among the United States (US) population from SSBs, soft drinks, other beverage groups, and the total diet based on the first 24-h recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles (2003-2004 through 2015-2016). SSBs included soft drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks, and fruit drinks, but excluded sports beverages with protein and sweetened teas/coffees. Among the total population (age ≥2 years: 57,026), energy intake from SSBs declined significantly from 183.9 ± 6.9 mean kcal/d (±SE) in 2003-2004 to 95.0 ± 3.5 in 2015-2016, while total sugar intake declined from 43.6 ± 1.7 mean g/d to 22.3 ± 0.8 (p-trend < 0.0001). Decreases were found for energy and total sugar intake, as well as percentage of energy and total sugar intake from SSBs, soft drinks, and all beverages for all age groups examined (≥2, 2-19, ≥20 years) (p-trend < 0.0001). From 2003 to 2016, energy and sugar intake from all beverages, SSBs, soft drinks, and the total diet decreased among the total population, children, and adults. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31450689/Trends_in_Intake_of_Energy_and_Total_Sugar_from_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverages_in_the_United_States_among_Children_and_Adults_NHANES_2003_2016_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11092004 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -