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Diversity and prevalence of parasitic infestation with zoonotic potential in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh.
J Adv Vet Anim Res 2019; 6(1):142-147JA

Abstract

Objective

Parasitic infestation is a major cause of losses in livestock production in tropical regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Gastro-intestinal (GI) parasites of dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba), and the prevalence of hemoparasites in camel from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Materials and Methods

A total of 87 fecal samples (32 dhumba and 55 camel) and 55 camel blood samples were collected during September-October 2015. Fecal samples were examined by direct smear, sedimentation method, flotation technique, and McMaster technique for GI parasite. Giemsa stained blood smears were examined under microscope for hemoparasite detection.

Results

62% camel (n = 34; 95% confidence interval (CI): 47.7-74.6) were infected with at least one genus of parasite. 15% camel were harboring more than one genus of parasite. The prevalence of GI parasite and hemoparasite in camel were recorded as Trichuris spp. (n = 16; 29%; 95% CI: 17.6-42.9), Balantidium coli (n = 12; 22%; 95% CI: 11.8-35.0), Trichostrongylus spp. (n = 7; 13%; 95% CI: 5.3-24.5), Strongyloides spp. (n = 5; 9%; 95% CI: 3.0-20.0), Anaplasma spp. (n = 5; 9%; 95% CI: 3.02-20.0), Paragonimus spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Schistosoma spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Hymenolepis spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Moniezia spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), and Babesia spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7). Mean EPG feces of camel was 291.76 ± 42.03 with a range of 0-1,400. Total 59.4% dhumba (n = 19; 95% CI: 41-76) were positive for GI parasite, including Trichostrongylus spp. (n = 10; 31.3%; 95% CI: 16.1-50), Strongyloides spp. (n = 9; 28%; 95% CI: 13.8-46.8), B. coli (n = 5; 15.6%; 95% CI: 5.3-32.8), and Trichuris spp. (n = 4; 12.5%; 95% CI: 3.5-28.9).

Conclusions

High percentage of parasitic infestation in camel and dhumba in the present study refers to the necessity of use of anthelmintic for health and production improvement and to prevent zoonotic parasite transmission to animal handler and workers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA.EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA. Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh.EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA. Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh.EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA. Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research (IEDCR), Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31453183

Citation

Islam, Ariful, et al. "Diversity and Prevalence of Parasitic Infestation With Zoonotic Potential in Dromedary Camel (Camelus Dromedarius) and Fat-tailed Sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh." Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, vol. 6, no. 1, 2019, pp. 142-147.
Islam A, Islam S, Ferdous J, et al. Diversity and prevalence of parasitic infestation with zoonotic potential in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh. J Adv Vet Anim Res. 2019;6(1):142-147.
Islam, A., Islam, S., Ferdous, J., Rahman, M. K., Uddin, M. H., Akter, S., ... Hassan, M. M. (2019). Diversity and prevalence of parasitic infestation with zoonotic potential in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh. Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, 6(1), pp. 142-147. doi:10.5455/javar.2019.f324.
Islam A, et al. Diversity and Prevalence of Parasitic Infestation With Zoonotic Potential in Dromedary Camel (Camelus Dromedarius) and Fat-tailed Sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh. J Adv Vet Anim Res. 2019;6(1):142-147. PubMed PMID: 31453183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diversity and prevalence of parasitic infestation with zoonotic potential in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba) in Bangladesh. AU - Islam,Ariful, AU - Islam,Shariful, AU - Ferdous,Jinnat, AU - Rahman,Md Kaisar, AU - Uddin,Md Helal, AU - Akter,Sazeda, AU - Rahman,Md Hafizar, AU - Hassan,Mohammad Mahmudul, Y1 - 2019/02/25/ PY - 2018/12/24/received PY - 2019/01/02/revised PY - 2019/01/12/accepted PY - 2019/8/28/entrez PY - 2019/8/28/pubmed PY - 2019/8/28/medline KW - Bangladesh KW - dromedary camel KW - fat-tailed sheep KW - gastro-intestinal parasite KW - hemoparasites SP - 142 EP - 147 JF - Journal of advanced veterinary and animal research JO - J Adv Vet Anim Res VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - Objective: Parasitic infestation is a major cause of losses in livestock production in tropical regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Gastro-intestinal (GI) parasites of dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and fat-tailed sheep (dhumba), and the prevalence of hemoparasites in camel from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 fecal samples (32 dhumba and 55 camel) and 55 camel blood samples were collected during September-October 2015. Fecal samples were examined by direct smear, sedimentation method, flotation technique, and McMaster technique for GI parasite. Giemsa stained blood smears were examined under microscope for hemoparasite detection. Results: 62% camel (n = 34; 95% confidence interval (CI): 47.7-74.6) were infected with at least one genus of parasite. 15% camel were harboring more than one genus of parasite. The prevalence of GI parasite and hemoparasite in camel were recorded as Trichuris spp. (n = 16; 29%; 95% CI: 17.6-42.9), Balantidium coli (n = 12; 22%; 95% CI: 11.8-35.0), Trichostrongylus spp. (n = 7; 13%; 95% CI: 5.3-24.5), Strongyloides spp. (n = 5; 9%; 95% CI: 3.0-20.0), Anaplasma spp. (n = 5; 9%; 95% CI: 3.02-20.0), Paragonimus spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Schistosoma spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Hymenolepis spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), Moniezia spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7), and Babesia spp. (n = 1; 2%; 95% CI: 0.05-9.7). Mean EPG feces of camel was 291.76 ± 42.03 with a range of 0-1,400. Total 59.4% dhumba (n = 19; 95% CI: 41-76) were positive for GI parasite, including Trichostrongylus spp. (n = 10; 31.3%; 95% CI: 16.1-50), Strongyloides spp. (n = 9; 28%; 95% CI: 13.8-46.8), B. coli (n = 5; 15.6%; 95% CI: 5.3-32.8), and Trichuris spp. (n = 4; 12.5%; 95% CI: 3.5-28.9). Conclusions: High percentage of parasitic infestation in camel and dhumba in the present study refers to the necessity of use of anthelmintic for health and production improvement and to prevent zoonotic parasite transmission to animal handler and workers. SN - 2311-7710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31453183/Diversity_and_prevalence_of_parasitic_infestation_with_zoonotic_potential_in_dromedary_camel_(Camelus_dromedarius)_and_fat-tailed_sheep_(dhumba)_in_Bangladesh DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -