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The influence of stimulus valence on perceptual processing of facial expressions and subsequent response inhibition.
Psychophysiology. 2020 02; 57(2):e13467.P

Abstract

The constant interplay between affective processing and cognitive control supports emotion regulation and appropriate social functioning. Even when affective stimuli are processed implicitly, threat-related stimuli are prioritized in the earliest stages of processing; yet, it remains unclear how implicit attention to affect influences subsequent cognitive control functions. The present study evaluated the influence of affective valence on early perceptual processes and subsequent response inhibition in a context where affective properties of the stimuli (facial expressions) were not critical for performing the task. Participants (N = 32) completed an affective stop-signal task (SST) while their scalp EEGs were recorded. The SST assessed response inhibition while participants implicitly attended to happy and afraid facial expressions that were matched for level of arousal. Behavioral performance was measured via response time and accuracy while physiological response was measured via the P100, N170, and N200/P300 ERP components. Decreased gender discrimination accuracy, delayed P100 latency, and more negative N170 amplitude were observed for afraid faces compared to happy faces, suggesting a shift in processing with respect to face valence. However, differences in stopping accuracy or N200/P300 ERP components during response inhibition were not observed, pointing to top-down cognitive processes likely being recruited to override the early automatic response to prioritize threat-related stimuli. Findings highlight that, in this implicit affective attention task, threat-related stimuli are prioritized early during processing, but implicitly attending to differentially valenced stimuli did not modulate subsequent cognitive control functions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.Department of Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.Department of Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31454096

Citation

Stockdale, Laura A., et al. "The Influence of Stimulus Valence On Perceptual Processing of Facial Expressions and Subsequent Response Inhibition." Psychophysiology, vol. 57, no. 2, 2020, pp. e13467.
Stockdale LA, Morrison RG, Silton RL. The influence of stimulus valence on perceptual processing of facial expressions and subsequent response inhibition. Psychophysiology. 2020;57(2):e13467.
Stockdale, L. A., Morrison, R. G., & Silton, R. L. (2020). The influence of stimulus valence on perceptual processing of facial expressions and subsequent response inhibition. Psychophysiology, 57(2), e13467. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13467
Stockdale LA, Morrison RG, Silton RL. The Influence of Stimulus Valence On Perceptual Processing of Facial Expressions and Subsequent Response Inhibition. Psychophysiology. 2020;57(2):e13467. PubMed PMID: 31454096.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of stimulus valence on perceptual processing of facial expressions and subsequent response inhibition. AU - Stockdale,Laura A, AU - Morrison,Robert G, AU - Silton,Rebecca L, Y1 - 2019/08/27/ PY - 2019/01/28/received PY - 2019/07/22/revised PY - 2019/07/26/accepted PY - 2019/8/28/pubmed PY - 2021/1/8/medline PY - 2019/8/28/entrez KW - ERP KW - N170 KW - N200/P300 KW - P100 KW - emotional face processing KW - response inhibition KW - stop-signal task SP - e13467 EP - e13467 JF - Psychophysiology JO - Psychophysiology VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - The constant interplay between affective processing and cognitive control supports emotion regulation and appropriate social functioning. Even when affective stimuli are processed implicitly, threat-related stimuli are prioritized in the earliest stages of processing; yet, it remains unclear how implicit attention to affect influences subsequent cognitive control functions. The present study evaluated the influence of affective valence on early perceptual processes and subsequent response inhibition in a context where affective properties of the stimuli (facial expressions) were not critical for performing the task. Participants (N = 32) completed an affective stop-signal task (SST) while their scalp EEGs were recorded. The SST assessed response inhibition while participants implicitly attended to happy and afraid facial expressions that were matched for level of arousal. Behavioral performance was measured via response time and accuracy while physiological response was measured via the P100, N170, and N200/P300 ERP components. Decreased gender discrimination accuracy, delayed P100 latency, and more negative N170 amplitude were observed for afraid faces compared to happy faces, suggesting a shift in processing with respect to face valence. However, differences in stopping accuracy or N200/P300 ERP components during response inhibition were not observed, pointing to top-down cognitive processes likely being recruited to override the early automatic response to prioritize threat-related stimuli. Findings highlight that, in this implicit affective attention task, threat-related stimuli are prioritized early during processing, but implicitly attending to differentially valenced stimuli did not modulate subsequent cognitive control functions. SN - 1540-5958 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31454096/The_influence_of_stimulus_valence_on_perceptual_processing_of_facial_expressions_and_subsequent_response_inhibition_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13467 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -