Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

At risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.
Addict Behav. 2019 12; 99:106087.AB

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Tobacco smoking and binge or excess drinking are unhealthy behaviors that frequently co-occur. Studies of Hispanics/Latinos have mostly been of Mexican Americans although there are substantial differences in smoking and drinking by heritage background. Associated with co-use by 5 subpopulations.

METHODS

Cross-sectional data of 16,412 Hispanics/Latinos from Miami, the Bronx, Chicago and San Diego collected between 2008 and 2011 as part of the HCHS/SOL were analyzed. Smoking and alcohol consumption and demographic data were measured by self-report. Prevalence of smoking and alcohol consumption and co-use were reported. Logistic regression models examined the odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess alcohol use by Hispanic/Latino background group.

RESULTS

Men of Cuban (10.3%), Puerto Rican (8.9%), and Mexican (8.9%) background had the highest prevalence of co-use of smoking and binge drinking compared to men of Central American (6.1%) and Dominican (6.6%) background. Women of Dominican (16.4%) and Puerto Rican (19.7%) background had the highest prevalence of binge drinking compared to women of Central American (10%) and Cuban (8%) background and Puerto Rican (34.1%) and Cuban (21.8%) women were the most likely to report current smoking compared to women of Central American (8.3%) and Mexican (10.4%) background. Acculturation was not associated with co-use among men and women. Elevated depressive symptoms were positively associated with smoking and binge drinking among men, OR = 1.5 [1.2-2.0], and women, OR = 1.5 [1.1-2.2]. Puerto Rican women had increased odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess drinking compared to Mexican American women, OR = 3.2 [1.5-6.6].

CONCLUSIONS

Puerto Rican and Dominican Latinas and Central American and South American men have a higher prevalence of co-use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food and Drug Administration, Center for Tobacco Products, United States of America. Electronic address: frank.bandiera@fda.hhs.gov.Division of Intramural Research, National Heart and Lung Blood Institute, and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, United States of America.University of Texas School of Public Health, United States of America.Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, United States of America.School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Miami, United States of America.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, United States of America.University of Illinois at Chicago, United States of America.Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States of America.Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University, United States of America.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, United States of America.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31466016

Citation

Bandiera, Frank C., et al. "At Risk Alcohol Consumption With Smoking By National Background: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/study of Latinos." Addictive Behaviors, vol. 99, 2019, p. 106087.
Bandiera FC, Pérez-Stable EJ, Atem F, et al. At risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. Addict Behav. 2019;99:106087.
Bandiera, F. C., Pérez-Stable, E. J., Atem, F., Caetano, R., Vidot, D. C., Gellman, M. D., Navas-Nacher, E. L., Cai, J., Talavera, G., Schneiderman, N., & Kaplan, R. (2019). At risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. Addictive Behaviors, 99, 106087. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106087
Bandiera FC, et al. At Risk Alcohol Consumption With Smoking By National Background: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/study of Latinos. Addict Behav. 2019;99:106087. PubMed PMID: 31466016.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - At risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. AU - Bandiera,Frank C, AU - Pérez-Stable,Eliseo J, AU - Atem,Folefac, AU - Caetano,Raul, AU - Vidot,Denise C, AU - Gellman,Marc D, AU - Navas-Nacher,Elena L, AU - Cai,Jianwen, AU - Talavera,Gregory, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, AU - Kaplan,Robert, Y1 - 2019/08/13/ PY - 2019/03/19/received PY - 2019/07/09/revised PY - 2019/08/12/accepted PY - 2019/8/30/pubmed PY - 2020/11/11/medline PY - 2019/8/30/entrez KW - Alcohol KW - Hispanics/Latinos KW - Smoking SP - 106087 EP - 106087 JF - Addictive behaviors JO - Addict Behav VL - 99 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Tobacco smoking and binge or excess drinking are unhealthy behaviors that frequently co-occur. Studies of Hispanics/Latinos have mostly been of Mexican Americans although there are substantial differences in smoking and drinking by heritage background. Associated with co-use by 5 subpopulations. METHODS: Cross-sectional data of 16,412 Hispanics/Latinos from Miami, the Bronx, Chicago and San Diego collected between 2008 and 2011 as part of the HCHS/SOL were analyzed. Smoking and alcohol consumption and demographic data were measured by self-report. Prevalence of smoking and alcohol consumption and co-use were reported. Logistic regression models examined the odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess alcohol use by Hispanic/Latino background group. RESULTS: Men of Cuban (10.3%), Puerto Rican (8.9%), and Mexican (8.9%) background had the highest prevalence of co-use of smoking and binge drinking compared to men of Central American (6.1%) and Dominican (6.6%) background. Women of Dominican (16.4%) and Puerto Rican (19.7%) background had the highest prevalence of binge drinking compared to women of Central American (10%) and Cuban (8%) background and Puerto Rican (34.1%) and Cuban (21.8%) women were the most likely to report current smoking compared to women of Central American (8.3%) and Mexican (10.4%) background. Acculturation was not associated with co-use among men and women. Elevated depressive symptoms were positively associated with smoking and binge drinking among men, OR = 1.5 [1.2-2.0], and women, OR = 1.5 [1.1-2.2]. Puerto Rican women had increased odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess drinking compared to Mexican American women, OR = 3.2 [1.5-6.6]. CONCLUSIONS: Puerto Rican and Dominican Latinas and Central American and South American men have a higher prevalence of co-use. SN - 1873-6327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31466016/At_risk_alcohol_consumption_with_smoking_by_national_background:_Results_from_the_Hispanic_community_health_study/study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4603(19)30323-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -