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Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging.
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2019; 47(4-6):335-344.DG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The capacity to mitigate dementia symptomology despite the prevailing brain pathology has been attributed to cognitive reserve.

OBJECTIVES

This study aimed to investigate how psychometric performance differs between individuals with a high school versus college education (surrogate measures for medium and high cognitive reserves) given the same level of brain pathology assessed using quantitative structural MRI.

METHODS

We used data from the Aging Brain: Vasculature, Ischemia, and Behavior Study (ABVIB). Cognition was assessed using a neuropsychological battery that included those contained in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) uniform data set. Participants with a medium and high cognitive reserve were matched by level of structural MRI changes, gender, and age.

RESULTS

Matched-pair regression analyses indicated that individuals with a higher education had a significantly better performance in recognition and verbal fluency animals, working memory, and processing speed in complex tasks. Moreover, they had a better performance in interference trails compared to individuals with a high school education (medium cognitive reserve).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that, given the same level of brain pathology, individuals with a higher education (cognitive reserve) benefit from a superior performance in semantic memory and executive functioning. Differences in these cognitive domains may be key pathways explaining how individuals with a high cognitive reserve are able to diminish dementia symptomatology despite physical changes in the brain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany, frodrigu@rhrk.uni-kl.de. Center for Cognitive Science, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany, frodrigu@rhrk.uni-kl.de.USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.USC Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31466060

Citation

Rodriguez, Francisca S., et al. "Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging." Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, vol. 47, no. 4-6, 2019, pp. 335-344.
Rodriguez FS, Zheng L, Chui HC, et al. Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2019;47(4-6):335-344.
Rodriguez, F. S., Zheng, L., & Chui, H. C. (2019). Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 47(4-6), 335-344. https://doi.org/10.1159/000501150
Rodriguez FS, et al. Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2019;47(4-6):335-344. PubMed PMID: 31466060.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychometric Characteristics of Cognitive Reserve: How High Education Might Improve Certain Cognitive Abilities in Aging. AU - Rodriguez,Francisca S, AU - Zheng,Ling, AU - Chui,Helena C, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/08/29/ PY - 2019/02/01/received PY - 2019/05/23/accepted PY - 2019/8/30/pubmed PY - 2020/1/23/medline PY - 2019/8/30/entrez KW - Cognitive aging KW - Cognitive impairment KW - Education KW - Psychometrics KW - Symptomatology SP - 335 EP - 344 JF - Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders JO - Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord VL - 47 IS - 4-6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The capacity to mitigate dementia symptomology despite the prevailing brain pathology has been attributed to cognitive reserve. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate how psychometric performance differs between individuals with a high school versus college education (surrogate measures for medium and high cognitive reserves) given the same level of brain pathology assessed using quantitative structural MRI. METHODS: We used data from the Aging Brain: Vasculature, Ischemia, and Behavior Study (ABVIB). Cognition was assessed using a neuropsychological battery that included those contained in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) uniform data set. Participants with a medium and high cognitive reserve were matched by level of structural MRI changes, gender, and age. RESULTS: Matched-pair regression analyses indicated that individuals with a higher education had a significantly better performance in recognition and verbal fluency animals, working memory, and processing speed in complex tasks. Moreover, they had a better performance in interference trails compared to individuals with a high school education (medium cognitive reserve). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, given the same level of brain pathology, individuals with a higher education (cognitive reserve) benefit from a superior performance in semantic memory and executive functioning. Differences in these cognitive domains may be key pathways explaining how individuals with a high cognitive reserve are able to diminish dementia symptomatology despite physical changes in the brain. SN - 1421-9824 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31466060/Psychometric_Characteristics_of_Cognitive_Reserve:_How_High_Education_Might_Improve_Certain_Cognitive_Abilities_in_Aging_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000501150 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -