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The long-term clinical outcomes of microvascular decompression for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery: a case series review.
BMC Neurol. 2019 Sep 03; 19(1):217.BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a type of neurosurgery used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN) caused by the vertebrobasilar contact/compression. The surgery is not risk-free, however; it may cause recurrent facial pain or other side-effects. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term pain relief and the complications of MVD surgery for the vertebrobasilar compression treatment.

METHODS

Twenty-three patients with TN compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery (VBA) were treated with MVD. Teflon felt was placed between the brain stem and the offending artery to mobilize the artery towards the skull base and the clivus. The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Intensity Scale score was used to assess pre- and post-surgical pains.

RESULTS

Of 23 patients with pre-operative BNI IV to V, 19 patients (83%) were pain-free after surgery. Four patients experienced transient partial pain relief with BNI II-III, and 3 of them (13%) were completely pain-free within 3 months. The success rate was 96%. Three patients (13%) had pain recurrences, and one received a second MVD surgery for pain relief during the period of follow-up. Four patients suffered from TN hypesthesia, and only 2 patients (8.6%) had permanent facial hypesthesia, while one patient (4.3%) developed a gradual hearing loss after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

While our success rate of immediate pain relief after surgery was comparable with some reports, the percentage of patients who had pain recurrences was lower, and cases who had permanent facial hypesthesia or developed a gradual hearing loss were fewer after MVD surgery. Our rate of transient complications was higher, and the postoperative pain relief seemed unusually delayed. Our study indicates that MVD is an effective, reliable, and safe neurosurgery for treatment of TN compressed by the VBA albeit our small sample size. Failure of treatment and recurrence of the disease as well as complications could be minimized by preventing displacement of the Teflon implant and extraneous Teflon touching the trigeminal nerves.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China.Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China.Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Southwestern Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China.Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China.Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China.Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China. 29176068@qq.com.Department of Neurosurgery, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, No. 10 Daping Changjiang Street, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400042, China. wxh19781206@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31481028

Citation

Wang, Xuhui, et al. "The Long-term Clinical Outcomes of Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia Compressed By the Vertebra-basilar Artery: a Case Series Review." BMC Neurology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 217.
Wang X, Wang H, Chen S, et al. The long-term clinical outcomes of microvascular decompression for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery: a case series review. BMC Neurol. 2019;19(1):217.
Wang, X., Wang, H., Chen, S., Liang, H., Wang, H., Xu, M., & Xu, L. (2019). The long-term clinical outcomes of microvascular decompression for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery: a case series review. BMC Neurology, 19(1), 217. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12883-019-1450-z
Wang X, et al. The Long-term Clinical Outcomes of Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia Compressed By the Vertebra-basilar Artery: a Case Series Review. BMC Neurol. 2019 Sep 3;19(1):217. PubMed PMID: 31481028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The long-term clinical outcomes of microvascular decompression for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery: a case series review. AU - Wang,Xuhui, AU - Wang,Hong, AU - Chen,Sha, AU - Liang,Hong, AU - Wang,Hao, AU - Xu,Minhui, AU - Xu,Lunshan, Y1 - 2019/09/03/ PY - 2018/09/05/received PY - 2019/08/27/accepted PY - 2019/9/5/entrez PY - 2019/9/5/pubmed PY - 2019/12/4/medline KW - Microvascular decompression KW - Neurosurgery KW - Trigeminal neuralgia KW - Vertebra-basilar artery SP - 217 EP - 217 JF - BMC neurology JO - BMC Neurol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a type of neurosurgery used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN) caused by the vertebrobasilar contact/compression. The surgery is not risk-free, however; it may cause recurrent facial pain or other side-effects. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term pain relief and the complications of MVD surgery for the vertebrobasilar compression treatment. METHODS: Twenty-three patients with TN compressed by the vertebra-basilar artery (VBA) were treated with MVD. Teflon felt was placed between the brain stem and the offending artery to mobilize the artery towards the skull base and the clivus. The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Pain Intensity Scale score was used to assess pre- and post-surgical pains. RESULTS: Of 23 patients with pre-operative BNI IV to V, 19 patients (83%) were pain-free after surgery. Four patients experienced transient partial pain relief with BNI II-III, and 3 of them (13%) were completely pain-free within 3 months. The success rate was 96%. Three patients (13%) had pain recurrences, and one received a second MVD surgery for pain relief during the period of follow-up. Four patients suffered from TN hypesthesia, and only 2 patients (8.6%) had permanent facial hypesthesia, while one patient (4.3%) developed a gradual hearing loss after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: While our success rate of immediate pain relief after surgery was comparable with some reports, the percentage of patients who had pain recurrences was lower, and cases who had permanent facial hypesthesia or developed a gradual hearing loss were fewer after MVD surgery. Our rate of transient complications was higher, and the postoperative pain relief seemed unusually delayed. Our study indicates that MVD is an effective, reliable, and safe neurosurgery for treatment of TN compressed by the VBA albeit our small sample size. Failure of treatment and recurrence of the disease as well as complications could be minimized by preventing displacement of the Teflon implant and extraneous Teflon touching the trigeminal nerves. SN - 1471-2377 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31481028/The_long_term_clinical_outcomes_of_microvascular_decompression_for_treatment_of_trigeminal_neuralgia_compressed_by_the_vertebra_basilar_artery:_a_case_series_review_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -