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Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2020 Apr; 35(2):331-334.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major complication confronting clinicians caring for premature infants. This investigation compares clinical outcomes before and after quality improvement-program interventions in a population of premature infants at intermediate risk for NEC.

METHODS

This study is a retrospective single-center chart review of infants admitted with a birth weight of 1000-1499 g, excluding major congenital anomalies, over a 6-year period, beginning with implementation of a donor breast-milk program when mother's own milk was not available. Infants were separated into 2 epochs, before (July 2012-December 2013) and after (April 2014-June 2018) introduction of human milk-derived fortifier (Prolacta) and a daily probiotic (FloraBABY) supplement.

RESULTS

Comparing 140 preintervention infants with 265 postintervention infants, NEC was significantly lower in the postintervention group: 5.2% vs 1.1% (P = 0.046). Somatic growth was similar in both epochs.

CONCLUSIONS

Quality-improvement initiatives utilizing an exclusive human-milk diet and daily probiotic supplementation were associated with a decreased incidence of NEC in infants with a birth weight of 1000-1499 g. Implementation of the NEC reduction bundle did not affect infant growth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mednax National Medical Group, Tacoma, WA, USA. Neonatal Intensive Care, Tacoma General Hospital, Tacoma, WA, USA.School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.Department of Pharmacy, Multicare Health System, Tacoma, WA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31482674

Citation

Sato, Ray, et al. "Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 35, no. 2, 2020, pp. 331-334.
Sato R, Malai S, Razmjouy B. Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight. Nutr Clin Pract. 2020;35(2):331-334.
Sato, R., Malai, S., & Razmjouy, B. (2020). Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 35(2), 331-334. https://doi.org/10.1002/ncp.10394
Sato R, Malai S, Razmjouy B. Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight. Nutr Clin Pract. 2020;35(2):331-334. PubMed PMID: 31482674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Necrotizing Enterocolitis Reduction Using an Exclusive Human-Milk Diet and Probiotic Supplementation in Infants With 1000-1499 Gram Birth Weight. AU - Sato,Ray, AU - Malai,Solyvattey, AU - Razmjouy,Behzad, Y1 - 2019/09/04/ PY - 2019/9/5/pubmed PY - 2019/9/5/medline PY - 2019/9/5/entrez KW - human milk KW - necrotizing enterocolitis KW - premature infant KW - probiotics KW - quality improvement SP - 331 EP - 334 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major complication confronting clinicians caring for premature infants. This investigation compares clinical outcomes before and after quality improvement-program interventions in a population of premature infants at intermediate risk for NEC. METHODS: This study is a retrospective single-center chart review of infants admitted with a birth weight of 1000-1499 g, excluding major congenital anomalies, over a 6-year period, beginning with implementation of a donor breast-milk program when mother's own milk was not available. Infants were separated into 2 epochs, before (July 2012-December 2013) and after (April 2014-June 2018) introduction of human milk-derived fortifier (Prolacta) and a daily probiotic (FloraBABY) supplement. RESULTS: Comparing 140 preintervention infants with 265 postintervention infants, NEC was significantly lower in the postintervention group: 5.2% vs 1.1% (P = 0.046). Somatic growth was similar in both epochs. CONCLUSIONS: Quality-improvement initiatives utilizing an exclusive human-milk diet and daily probiotic supplementation were associated with a decreased incidence of NEC in infants with a birth weight of 1000-1499 g. Implementation of the NEC reduction bundle did not affect infant growth. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31482674/Necrotizing_Enterocolitis_Reduction_Using_an_Exclusive_Human-Milk_Diet_and_Probiotic_Supplementation_in_Infants_With_1000-1499_Gram_Birth_Weight L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ncp.10394 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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