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Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit.
Neurocrit Care. 2019 12; 31(3):534-545.NC

Abstract

Within the last couple of decades, advances in critical care medicine have led to increased survival of critically ill patients, as well as the discovery of notable, long-term health challenges in survivors and their loved ones. The terms post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) and PICS-family (PICS-F) have been used in non-neurocritical care populations to characterize the cognitive, psychiatric, and physical sequelae associated with critical care hospitalization in survivors and their informal caregivers (e.g., family and friends who provide unpaid care). In this review, we first summarize the literature on the cognitive, psychiatric, and physical correlates of PICS and PICS-F in non-neurocritical patient populations and draw attention to their long-term negative health consequences. Next, keeping in mind the distinction between disease-related neurocognitive changes and those that are associated directly with the experience of a critical illness, we review the neuropsychological sequelae among patients with common neurocritical illnesses. We acknowledge the clinical factors contributing to the difficulty in studying PICS in the neurocritical care patient population, provide recommendations for future lines of research, and encourage collaboration among critical care physicians in all specialties to facilitate continuity of care and to help elucidate mechanism(s) of PICS and PICS-F in all critical illness survivors. Finally, we discuss the importance of early detection of PICS and PICS-F as an opportunity for multidisciplinary interventions to prevent and treat new neuropsychological deficits in the neurocritical care population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurocritical Care, Department of Neurosciences, University of California-San Diego, 9444 Medical Center Drive, ECOB 3-028, MC 7740, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA. jlabuzetta@ucsd.edu.Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA. Integrated Brain Health Clinical and Research Program, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31486026

Citation

LaBuzetta, Jamie Nicole, et al. "Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit." Neurocritical Care, vol. 31, no. 3, 2019, pp. 534-545.
LaBuzetta JN, Rosand J, Vranceanu AM. Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit. Neurocrit Care. 2019;31(3):534-545.
LaBuzetta, J. N., Rosand, J., & Vranceanu, A. M. (2019). Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit. Neurocritical Care, 31(3), 534-545. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-019-00826-0
LaBuzetta JN, Rosand J, Vranceanu AM. Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit. Neurocrit Care. 2019;31(3):534-545. PubMed PMID: 31486026.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome: Unique Challenges in the Neurointensive Care Unit. AU - LaBuzetta,Jamie Nicole, AU - Rosand,Jonathan, AU - Vranceanu,Ana-Maria, PY - 2019/9/6/pubmed PY - 2020/5/13/medline PY - 2019/9/6/entrez KW - Critical care KW - PICS KW - PICS-family KW - Post-intensive care syndrome SP - 534 EP - 545 JF - Neurocritical care JO - Neurocrit Care VL - 31 IS - 3 N2 - Within the last couple of decades, advances in critical care medicine have led to increased survival of critically ill patients, as well as the discovery of notable, long-term health challenges in survivors and their loved ones. The terms post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) and PICS-family (PICS-F) have been used in non-neurocritical care populations to characterize the cognitive, psychiatric, and physical sequelae associated with critical care hospitalization in survivors and their informal caregivers (e.g., family and friends who provide unpaid care). In this review, we first summarize the literature on the cognitive, psychiatric, and physical correlates of PICS and PICS-F in non-neurocritical patient populations and draw attention to their long-term negative health consequences. Next, keeping in mind the distinction between disease-related neurocognitive changes and those that are associated directly with the experience of a critical illness, we review the neuropsychological sequelae among patients with common neurocritical illnesses. We acknowledge the clinical factors contributing to the difficulty in studying PICS in the neurocritical care patient population, provide recommendations for future lines of research, and encourage collaboration among critical care physicians in all specialties to facilitate continuity of care and to help elucidate mechanism(s) of PICS and PICS-F in all critical illness survivors. Finally, we discuss the importance of early detection of PICS and PICS-F as an opportunity for multidisciplinary interventions to prevent and treat new neuropsychological deficits in the neurocritical care population. SN - 1556-0961 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31486026/Review:_Post_Intensive_Care_Syndrome:_Unique_Challenges_in_the_Neurointensive_Care_Unit_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12028-019-00826-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -