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Relationships between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine exposure and metabolism in early postpartum and non-peripartum women with hypertension.
Pregnancy Hypertens 2019; 17:209-215PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine (AML) exposure and metabolism parameters in early postpartum and non-peripartum women.

METHODS

Twenty-four AML-treated early postpartum women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and 30 non-peripartum women with essential hypertension were enrolled. Blood samples for determination of CYP3A markers including total cholesterol-adjusted 4β-hydroxycholesterol (4β-OHC/TC), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), and AML and its metabolites in plasma were collected at 24 h after the AML treatment.

RESULTS

The plasma 4β-OHC/TC in postpartum women was higher than that in non-peripartum women, while the plasma 25-OHD was lower. The postpartum women had a lower plasma AML concentration and its metabolic ratio was higher. The plasma 4β-OHC/TC decreased as the number of days post-delivery increased. The plasma AML concentration increased as the number of days post-delivery increased, while the metabolic ratio of AML declined slightly. Tendency toward negative correlations between the plasma 4β-OHC/TC but not 25-OHD, and AML concentration were observed in both postpartum and non-peripartum women. In both groups, the plasma 4β-OHC/TC was correlated with the metabolic ratio of AML.

CONCLUSIONS

The early postpartum women had higher plasma 4β-OHC and AML metabolism. The plasma 4β-OHC had positive relationships with amlodipine metabolism in both women groups. AML metabolism and plasma 4β-OHC may be useful as CYP3A markers in early postpartum and non-peripartum women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan. Electronic address: naitou@hama-med.ac.jp.Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.Department of Rheumatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31487643

Citation

Taguchi, Reina, et al. "Relationships Between Endogenous CYP3A Markers and Plasma Amlodipine Exposure and Metabolism in Early Postpartum and Non-peripartum Women With Hypertension." Pregnancy Hypertension, vol. 17, 2019, pp. 209-215.
Taguchi R, Naito T, Kubono N, et al. Relationships between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine exposure and metabolism in early postpartum and non-peripartum women with hypertension. Pregnancy Hypertens. 2019;17:209-215.
Taguchi, R., Naito, T., Kubono, N., Ogawa, N., Itoh, H., & Kawakami, J. (2019). Relationships between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine exposure and metabolism in early postpartum and non-peripartum women with hypertension. Pregnancy Hypertension, 17, pp. 209-215. doi:10.1016/j.preghy.2019.07.002.
Taguchi R, et al. Relationships Between Endogenous CYP3A Markers and Plasma Amlodipine Exposure and Metabolism in Early Postpartum and Non-peripartum Women With Hypertension. Pregnancy Hypertens. 2019;17:209-215. PubMed PMID: 31487643.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine exposure and metabolism in early postpartum and non-peripartum women with hypertension. AU - Taguchi,Reina, AU - Naito,Takafumi, AU - Kubono,Naoko, AU - Ogawa,Noriyoshi, AU - Itoh,Hiroaki, AU - Kawakami,Junichi, Y1 - 2019/07/04/ PY - 2019/03/07/received PY - 2019/06/02/revised PY - 2019/07/03/accepted PY - 2019/9/6/pubmed PY - 2019/9/6/medline PY - 2019/9/6/entrez KW - 25-Hydroxyvitamin D KW - 4β-Hydroxycholesterol KW - Amlodipine KW - CYP3A KW - Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy KW - Metabolism SP - 209 EP - 215 JF - Pregnancy hypertension JO - Pregnancy Hypertens VL - 17 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between endogenous CYP3A markers and plasma amlodipine (AML) exposure and metabolism parameters in early postpartum and non-peripartum women. METHODS: Twenty-four AML-treated early postpartum women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and 30 non-peripartum women with essential hypertension were enrolled. Blood samples for determination of CYP3A markers including total cholesterol-adjusted 4β-hydroxycholesterol (4β-OHC/TC), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), and AML and its metabolites in plasma were collected at 24 h after the AML treatment. RESULTS: The plasma 4β-OHC/TC in postpartum women was higher than that in non-peripartum women, while the plasma 25-OHD was lower. The postpartum women had a lower plasma AML concentration and its metabolic ratio was higher. The plasma 4β-OHC/TC decreased as the number of days post-delivery increased. The plasma AML concentration increased as the number of days post-delivery increased, while the metabolic ratio of AML declined slightly. Tendency toward negative correlations between the plasma 4β-OHC/TC but not 25-OHD, and AML concentration were observed in both postpartum and non-peripartum women. In both groups, the plasma 4β-OHC/TC was correlated with the metabolic ratio of AML. CONCLUSIONS: The early postpartum women had higher plasma 4β-OHC and AML metabolism. The plasma 4β-OHC had positive relationships with amlodipine metabolism in both women groups. AML metabolism and plasma 4β-OHC may be useful as CYP3A markers in early postpartum and non-peripartum women. SN - 2210-7797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31487643/Relationships_between_endogenous_CYP3A_markers_and_plasma_amlodipine_exposure_and_metabolism_in_early_postpartum_and_non-peripartum_women_with_hypertension L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2210-7789(19)30060-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -