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Longer duration of kangaroo care improves neurobehavioral performance and feeding in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial.
Pediatr Res. 2020 03; 87(4):683-688.PR

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the effect of kangaroo care (KC) and its duration on neurobehavioral performance, stress response, breastfeeding success, and vital signs in premature infants.

METHODS

One hundred and twenty premature infants were randomized to receive either KC for 60 min daily, KC for 120 min daily or conventional care (controls) for at least 7 days. Salivary cortisol was measured before and after the first KC session and then after 7 days. Temperature, respiration rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded, before and after KC. Neonates were evaluated by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS).

RESULTS

Both KC groups demonstrated higher scores for attention, arousal, regulation, nonoptimal reflexes, and quality of movements and lower scores for handling, excitability, and lethargy, compared to controls (p < 0.05). Both KC groups had higher infant breastfeeding assessment tool score and reached full enteral feeds faster than controls (p < 0.05). After the first KC session, improvement in O2 saturation and temperature was observed in KC 120-min group compared with the KC 60-min group (p < 0.05). Salivary cortisol decreased in both KC groups compared with controls after 7 days (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Preterm neonates who receive KC for long durations reach full enteral feeds faster, have better breastfeeding success, neurobehavioral performance, thermal control, and tissue oxygenation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. dinashinkar@med.asu.edu.eg.Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt.Ministry of Health, Cairo, Egypt.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31493775

Citation

El-Farrash, Rania A., et al. "Longer Duration of Kangaroo Care Improves Neurobehavioral Performance and Feeding in Preterm Infants: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Pediatric Research, vol. 87, no. 4, 2020, pp. 683-688.
El-Farrash RA, Shinkar DM, Ragab DA, et al. Longer duration of kangaroo care improves neurobehavioral performance and feeding in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Res. 2020;87(4):683-688.
El-Farrash, R. A., Shinkar, D. M., Ragab, D. A., Salem, R. M., Saad, W. E., Farag, A. S., Salama, D. H., & Sakr, M. F. (2020). Longer duration of kangaroo care improves neurobehavioral performance and feeding in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatric Research, 87(4), 683-688. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-019-0558-6
El-Farrash RA, et al. Longer Duration of Kangaroo Care Improves Neurobehavioral Performance and Feeding in Preterm Infants: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatr Res. 2020;87(4):683-688. PubMed PMID: 31493775.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longer duration of kangaroo care improves neurobehavioral performance and feeding in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial. AU - El-Farrash,Rania A, AU - Shinkar,Dina M, AU - Ragab,Dina A, AU - Salem,Ramy M, AU - Saad,Wessam E, AU - Farag,Ahmed S, AU - Salama,Dina H, AU - Sakr,Medhat F, Y1 - 2019/09/07/ PY - 2018/12/02/received PY - 2019/07/03/accepted PY - 2019/06/28/revised PY - 2019/9/8/pubmed PY - 2021/4/7/medline PY - 2019/9/8/entrez SP - 683 EP - 688 JF - Pediatric research JO - Pediatr Res VL - 87 IS - 4 N2 - AIM: To investigate the effect of kangaroo care (KC) and its duration on neurobehavioral performance, stress response, breastfeeding success, and vital signs in premature infants. METHODS: One hundred and twenty premature infants were randomized to receive either KC for 60 min daily, KC for 120 min daily or conventional care (controls) for at least 7 days. Salivary cortisol was measured before and after the first KC session and then after 7 days. Temperature, respiration rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded, before and after KC. Neonates were evaluated by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS). RESULTS: Both KC groups demonstrated higher scores for attention, arousal, regulation, nonoptimal reflexes, and quality of movements and lower scores for handling, excitability, and lethargy, compared to controls (p < 0.05). Both KC groups had higher infant breastfeeding assessment tool score and reached full enteral feeds faster than controls (p < 0.05). After the first KC session, improvement in O2 saturation and temperature was observed in KC 120-min group compared with the KC 60-min group (p < 0.05). Salivary cortisol decreased in both KC groups compared with controls after 7 days (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Preterm neonates who receive KC for long durations reach full enteral feeds faster, have better breastfeeding success, neurobehavioral performance, thermal control, and tissue oxygenation. SN - 1530-0447 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31493775/Longer_duration_of_kangaroo_care_improves_neurobehavioral_performance_and_feeding_in_preterm_infants:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -