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The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: An Overview of Clinical Trials.
Cell Transplant 2019; :963689719873890CT

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating, and degenerative disease that affects the central nervous system. A recent study showed that interaction between the immune system and the gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of MS. This review reports the clinical studies carried out in recent years that aimed to evaluate the composition of the microbiota in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). We also report what is available in the literature regarding the effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation and the role of the diet in restoring the intestinal bacterial population. Studies report that patients with RR-MS have a microbiota that, compared with healthy controls, has higher amounts of Pedobacteria, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Mycoplana, Acinetobacter, Eggerthella, Dorea, Blautia, Streptococcus and Akkermansia. In contrast, MS patients have a microbiota with impoverished microbial populations of Prevotella, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Haemophilus, Sutterella, Adlercreutzia, Coprobacillus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Anaerostipes and Faecalibacterium. In conclusion, the restoration of the microbial population in patients with RR-MS appears to reduce inflammatory events and the reactivation of the immune system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

IRCCS Centro Neurolesi "Bonino Pulejo", Messina, Italy. Both the authors contributed equally to this article.IRCCS Centro Neurolesi "Bonino Pulejo", Messina, Italy. Both the authors contributed equally to this article.IRCCS Centro Neurolesi "Bonino Pulejo", Messina, Italy.IRCCS Centro Neurolesi "Bonino Pulejo", Messina, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31512505

Citation

Schepici, Giovanni, et al. "The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: an Overview of Clinical Trials." Cell Transplantation, 2019, p. 963689719873890.
Schepici G, Silvestro S, Bramanti P, et al. The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: An Overview of Clinical Trials. Cell Transplant. 2019.
Schepici, G., Silvestro, S., Bramanti, P., & Mazzon, E. (2019). The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: An Overview of Clinical Trials. Cell Transplantation, p. 963689719873890. doi:10.1177/0963689719873890.
Schepici G, et al. The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: an Overview of Clinical Trials. Cell Transplant. 2019 Sep 12;963689719873890. PubMed PMID: 31512505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis: An Overview of Clinical Trials. AU - Schepici,Giovanni, AU - Silvestro,Serena, AU - Bramanti,Placido, AU - Mazzon,Emanuela, Y1 - 2019/09/12/ PY - 2019/9/13/entrez KW - diet KW - fecal microbiota transplantation KW - microbiota KW - multiple sclerosis SP - 963689719873890 EP - 963689719873890 JF - Cell transplantation JO - Cell Transplant N2 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating, and degenerative disease that affects the central nervous system. A recent study showed that interaction between the immune system and the gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of MS. This review reports the clinical studies carried out in recent years that aimed to evaluate the composition of the microbiota in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). We also report what is available in the literature regarding the effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation and the role of the diet in restoring the intestinal bacterial population. Studies report that patients with RR-MS have a microbiota that, compared with healthy controls, has higher amounts of Pedobacteria, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Mycoplana, Acinetobacter, Eggerthella, Dorea, Blautia, Streptococcus and Akkermansia. In contrast, MS patients have a microbiota with impoverished microbial populations of Prevotella, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Haemophilus, Sutterella, Adlercreutzia, Coprobacillus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Anaerostipes and Faecalibacterium. In conclusion, the restoration of the microbial population in patients with RR-MS appears to reduce inflammatory events and the reactivation of the immune system. SN - 1555-3892 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31512505/The_Gut_Microbiota_in_Multiple_Sclerosis:_An_Overview_of_Clinical_Trials L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0963689719873890?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -