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Detection and Identification of Pattern Information on an Electrostatic Friction Display.

Abstract

An electrostatic friction modulation device based on a tablet computer was used to present pattern stimuli to the fingertip for two tasks: detecting patches of friction and matching a frictional pattern to the visual image that produced it. In the detection task, friction patterns were displayed on zero, one two or three cells in a matrix. Errors, whether misses or false alarms, were few. Duration of target-present trials was a linear function of the number of patterns in the display. The intercept indicated an average of under 1 sec to test a location for the presence of a friction patch. The slope was 1.0 sec per item, representing the time to confirm friction change, verify the location, and report. In contrast to fast and accurate detection of friction modulation, identification of patterns by matching to a visual display was at chance, although the patterns were differentiated by form and scale. Given that the patterns fall within the normal acuity of the fingertip, along with previous evidence that fingertip motion per se does not preclude pattern recognition, it appears that the failure to match tactual patterns to visual images resides in processes inherent in information pickup from friction-modulation displays.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31514155

Citation

Klatzky, Roberta L., et al. "Detection and Identification of Pattern Information On an Electrostatic Friction Display." IEEE Transactions On Haptics, 2019.
Klatzky RL, Nayak A, Stephen I, et al. Detection and Identification of Pattern Information on an Electrostatic Friction Display. IEEE Trans Haptics. 2019.
Klatzky, R. L., Nayak, A., Stephen, I., Dijour, D., & Tan, H. Z. (2019). Detection and Identification of Pattern Information on an Electrostatic Friction Display. IEEE Transactions On Haptics, doi:10.1109/TOH.2019.2940215.
Klatzky RL, et al. Detection and Identification of Pattern Information On an Electrostatic Friction Display. IEEE Trans Haptics. 2019 Sep 10; PubMed PMID: 31514155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection and Identification of Pattern Information on an Electrostatic Friction Display. AU - Klatzky,Roberta L, AU - Nayak,Amukta, AU - Stephen,Isobel, AU - Dijour,Dean, AU - Tan,Hong Z, Y1 - 2019/09/10/ PY - 2019/9/13/pubmed PY - 2019/9/13/medline PY - 2019/9/13/entrez JF - IEEE transactions on haptics JO - IEEE Trans Haptics N2 - An electrostatic friction modulation device based on a tablet computer was used to present pattern stimuli to the fingertip for two tasks: detecting patches of friction and matching a frictional pattern to the visual image that produced it. In the detection task, friction patterns were displayed on zero, one two or three cells in a matrix. Errors, whether misses or false alarms, were few. Duration of target-present trials was a linear function of the number of patterns in the display. The intercept indicated an average of under 1 sec to test a location for the presence of a friction patch. The slope was 1.0 sec per item, representing the time to confirm friction change, verify the location, and report. In contrast to fast and accurate detection of friction modulation, identification of patterns by matching to a visual display was at chance, although the patterns were differentiated by form and scale. Given that the patterns fall within the normal acuity of the fingertip, along with previous evidence that fingertip motion per se does not preclude pattern recognition, it appears that the failure to match tactual patterns to visual images resides in processes inherent in information pickup from friction-modulation displays. SN - 2329-4051 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31514155/Detection_and_Identification_of_Pattern_Information_on_an_Electrostatic_Friction_Display L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TOH.2019.2940215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -