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Seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The minerals, vitamins, soluble dietary fibers, and flavonoids of seaweed are protective for preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, the association between seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease has not been established.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the dietary intake of seaweed and its impact upon stroke and ischemic heart disease risk among a Japanese study population.

METHODS

We surveyed 40,707 men and 45,406 women from 2 large cohorts (age range: 40-69 y). Seaweed intake was determined by FFQ at baseline (1990-1994). Incidences of stroke and ischemic heart disease were ascertained until the end of 2009 (Cohort I) or 2012 (Cohort II). Sex-specific cardiovascular disease HRs (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models after stratification by area and adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk and dietary factors.

RESULTS

During 1,493,232 person-years of follow-up, 4777 strokes (2863 ischemic stroke, 1361 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, and 531 subarachnoid hemorrhages) and 1204 ischemic heart disease cases were identified. Among men, significant multivariable HRs (95% CIs) for almost daily consumption compared with almost no consumption of seaweed were seen in ischemic heart disease [0.76 (0.58, 0.99); P-trend = 0.04] and total cardiovascular diseases [0.88 (0.78, 1.00); P-trend = 0.08]. Among women, such inverse associations were 0.56 (0.36, 0.85; P-trend = 0.006) for ischemic heart disease and 0.89 (0.76, 1.05; P-trend = 0.10) for total cardiovascular diseases. No significant associations were observed between seaweed intake and risk of total stroke or stroke types among either men or women.

CONCLUSIONS

Seaweed intake was inversely associated with risk of ischemic heart disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan, and Health Services Research and Development Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan, and Health Services Research and Development Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan, and Health Services Research and Development Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan.Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Yufu, Japan.Department of Public Health, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan.Department of Food and Life Science, School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan, and Health Services Research and Development Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan. Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan.Department of Food and Life Science, School of Life and Environmental Science, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31518387

Citation

Murai, Utako, et al. "Seaweed Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2019.
Murai U, Yamagishi K, Sata M, et al. Seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019.
Murai, U., Yamagishi, K., Sata, M., Kokubo, Y., Saito, I., Yatsuya, H., ... Tsugane, S. (2019). Seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqz231.
Murai U, et al. Seaweed Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Sep 13; PubMed PMID: 31518387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) Study. AU - Murai,Utako, AU - Yamagishi,Kazumasa, AU - Sata,Mizuki, AU - Kokubo,Yoshihiro, AU - Saito,Isao, AU - Yatsuya,Hiroshi, AU - Ishihara,Junko, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Sawada,Norie, AU - Iso,Hiroyasu, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/09/13/ PY - 2019/04/26/received PY - 2019/08/20/accepted PY - 2019/9/14/entrez PY - 2019/9/14/pubmed PY - 2019/9/14/medline KW - diet KW - epidemiology KW - follow-up study KW - ischemic heart disease KW - risk factor JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. N2 - BACKGROUND: The minerals, vitamins, soluble dietary fibers, and flavonoids of seaweed are protective for preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, the association between seaweed intake and risk of cardiovascular disease has not been established. OBJECTIVES: We examined the dietary intake of seaweed and its impact upon stroke and ischemic heart disease risk among a Japanese study population. METHODS: We surveyed 40,707 men and 45,406 women from 2 large cohorts (age range: 40-69 y). Seaweed intake was determined by FFQ at baseline (1990-1994). Incidences of stroke and ischemic heart disease were ascertained until the end of 2009 (Cohort I) or 2012 (Cohort II). Sex-specific cardiovascular disease HRs (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models after stratification by area and adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk and dietary factors. RESULTS: During 1,493,232 person-years of follow-up, 4777 strokes (2863 ischemic stroke, 1361 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, and 531 subarachnoid hemorrhages) and 1204 ischemic heart disease cases were identified. Among men, significant multivariable HRs (95% CIs) for almost daily consumption compared with almost no consumption of seaweed were seen in ischemic heart disease [0.76 (0.58, 0.99); P-trend = 0.04] and total cardiovascular diseases [0.88 (0.78, 1.00); P-trend = 0.08]. Among women, such inverse associations were 0.56 (0.36, 0.85; P-trend = 0.006) for ischemic heart disease and 0.89 (0.76, 1.05; P-trend = 0.10) for total cardiovascular diseases. No significant associations were observed between seaweed intake and risk of total stroke or stroke types among either men or women. CONCLUSIONS: Seaweed intake was inversely associated with risk of ischemic heart disease. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31518387/Seaweed_intake_and_risk_of_cardiovascular_disease:_the_Japan_Public_Health_Center-based_Prospective_(JPHC)_Study L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqz231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -