Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Thalamic GABA may modulate cognitive control in restless legs syndrome.
Neurosci Lett 2019; 712:134494NL

Abstract

The restless legs syndrome (RLS) has repeatedly, but not exclusively, been associated with functional thalamic changes as well as changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. This has been linked to the well-known sensory-motor symptoms, but it has never been investigated whether those factors also account for potential cognitive changes in RLS, even though they are known to play an important role for cognitive control. To investigate the potential relationship between thalamic GABA concentrations and cognitive control in n = 25 RLS patients; a neuropsychological experimental paradigm was used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Compared to n = 31 healthy controls, RLS patients displayed reduced cognitive control capacities, which were most likely based on working memory deficits. On the neurobiochemical level, (relatively) elevated thalamic GABA levels attenuated control deficits only in the RLS group, even though there were no group differences with respect to overall GABA levels. Given that RLS patients are known to display thalamic hyperactivity and associated thalamic hypoconnectivity, (relatively) higher GABA levels may have helped RLS patients to "compensate" for this pathological factor. Our findings specify the functional relevance of thalamic GABAergic neurotransmission for cognition in RLS, even though changes in GABAergic neurotransmission might not be the ultimate cause of control deficits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technische Universität Dresden, Schubertstr. 42, 01307 Dresden, Germany.Institute and Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraβe 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.Department of Neurology, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraβe 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.Department of Neurology, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraβe 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Dresden, Arnoldstraβe 18, 01307 Dresden, Germany.Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technische Universität Dresden, Schubertstr. 42, 01307 Dresden, Germany.Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technische Universität Dresden, Schubertstr. 42, 01307 Dresden, Germany. Electronic address: Ann-Kathrin.Stock@uniklinikum-dresden.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31520647

Citation

Zhang, Rui, et al. "Thalamic GABA May Modulate Cognitive Control in Restless Legs Syndrome." Neuroscience Letters, vol. 712, 2019, p. 134494.
Zhang R, Werner A, Hermann W, et al. Thalamic GABA may modulate cognitive control in restless legs syndrome. Neurosci Lett. 2019;712:134494.
Zhang, R., Werner, A., Hermann, W., Brandt, M. D., Beste, C., & Stock, A. K. (2019). Thalamic GABA may modulate cognitive control in restless legs syndrome. Neuroscience Letters, 712, p. 134494. doi:10.1016/j.neulet.2019.134494.
Zhang R, et al. Thalamic GABA May Modulate Cognitive Control in Restless Legs Syndrome. Neurosci Lett. 2019 Sep 11;712:134494. PubMed PMID: 31520647.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thalamic GABA may modulate cognitive control in restless legs syndrome. AU - Zhang,Rui, AU - Werner,Annett, AU - Hermann,Wiebke, AU - Brandt,Moritz D, AU - Beste,Christian, AU - Stock,Ann-Kathrin, Y1 - 2019/09/11/ PY - 2019/04/26/received PY - 2019/09/03/revised PY - 2019/09/10/accepted PY - 2019/9/15/pubmed PY - 2019/9/15/medline PY - 2019/9/15/entrez KW - Cognitive control KW - Implicit learning KW - MRS KW - Restless legs syndrome KW - Thalamic GABA KW - Working memory SP - 134494 EP - 134494 JF - Neuroscience letters JO - Neurosci. Lett. VL - 712 N2 - The restless legs syndrome (RLS) has repeatedly, but not exclusively, been associated with functional thalamic changes as well as changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. This has been linked to the well-known sensory-motor symptoms, but it has never been investigated whether those factors also account for potential cognitive changes in RLS, even though they are known to play an important role for cognitive control. To investigate the potential relationship between thalamic GABA concentrations and cognitive control in n = 25 RLS patients; a neuropsychological experimental paradigm was used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Compared to n = 31 healthy controls, RLS patients displayed reduced cognitive control capacities, which were most likely based on working memory deficits. On the neurobiochemical level, (relatively) elevated thalamic GABA levels attenuated control deficits only in the RLS group, even though there were no group differences with respect to overall GABA levels. Given that RLS patients are known to display thalamic hyperactivity and associated thalamic hypoconnectivity, (relatively) higher GABA levels may have helped RLS patients to "compensate" for this pathological factor. Our findings specify the functional relevance of thalamic GABAergic neurotransmission for cognition in RLS, even though changes in GABAergic neurotransmission might not be the ultimate cause of control deficits. SN - 1872-7972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31520647/Thalamic_GABA_may_modulate_cognitive_control_in_restless_legs_syndrome L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3940(19)30597-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -