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Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 2019; 51(10):2041-2049MS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Recently, it has been speculated that protein supplementation may further augment the adaptations to chronic endurance exercise training. We assessed the effect of protein supplementation during chronic endurance exercise training on whole-body oxidative capacity (V˙O2max) and endurance exercise performance.

METHODS

In this double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial, 60 recreationally active males (age, 27 ± 6 yr; body mass index, 23.8 ± 2.6 kg·m; V˙O2max, 47 ± 6 mL·min·kg) were subjected to 12 wk of triweekly endurance exercise training. After each session and each night before sleep, participants ingested either a protein supplement (PRO; 28.7 g casein protein) or an isoenergetic carbohydrate placebo (PLA). Before and after the 12 wk of training, V˙O2max and endurance exercise performance (~10-km time trial) were assessed on a cycle ergometer. Muscular endurance (total workload achieved during 30 reciprocal isokinetic contractions) was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry and body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied to assess whether training adaptations differed between groups.

RESULTS

Endurance exercise training induced an 11% ± 6% increase in V˙O2max (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (PRO, 48 ± 6 to 53 ± 7 mL·min·kg; PLA, 46 ± 5 to 51 ± 6 mL·min·kg; time-treatment interaction, P = 0.50). Time to complete the time trial was reduced by 14% ± 7% (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (time-treatment interaction, P = 0.15). Muscular endurance increased by 6% ± 7% (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (time-treatment interaction, P = 0.84). Leg lean mass showed an increase after training (P < 0.0001), which tended to be greater in PRO compared with PLA (0.5 ± 0.7 vs 0.2 ± 0.6 kg, respectively; time-treatment interaction, P = 0.073).

CONCLUSION

Protein supplementation after exercise and before sleep does not further augment the gains in whole-body oxidative capacity and endurance exercise performance after chronic endurance exercise training in recreationally active, healthy young males.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.FrieslandCampina, Amersfoort, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS. Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM, Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht, THE NETHERLANDS.Institute of Sports and Exercise Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, THE NETHERLANDS.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31525168

Citation

Jonvik, Kristin L., et al. "Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 51, no. 10, 2019, pp. 2041-2049.
Jonvik KL, Paulussen KJM, Danen SL, et al. Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2019;51(10):2041-2049.
Jonvik, K. L., Paulussen, K. J. M., Danen, S. L., Ceelen, I. J. M., Horstman, A. M., Wardenaar, F. C., ... VAN Dijk, J. W. (2019). Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 51(10), pp. 2041-2049. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000002028.
Jonvik KL, et al. Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2019;51(10):2041-2049. PubMed PMID: 31525168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protein Supplementation Does Not Augment Adaptations to Endurance Exercise Training. AU - Jonvik,Kristin L, AU - Paulussen,Kevin J M, AU - Danen,Shiannah L, AU - Ceelen,Ingrid J M, AU - Horstman,Astrid M, AU - Wardenaar,Floris C, AU - VAN Loon,Luc J C, AU - VAN Dijk,Jan-Willem, PY - 2019/9/17/entrez PY - 2019/9/17/pubmed PY - 2019/9/17/medline SP - 2041 EP - 2049 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 51 IS - 10 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Recently, it has been speculated that protein supplementation may further augment the adaptations to chronic endurance exercise training. We assessed the effect of protein supplementation during chronic endurance exercise training on whole-body oxidative capacity (V˙O2max) and endurance exercise performance. METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial, 60 recreationally active males (age, 27 ± 6 yr; body mass index, 23.8 ± 2.6 kg·m; V˙O2max, 47 ± 6 mL·min·kg) were subjected to 12 wk of triweekly endurance exercise training. After each session and each night before sleep, participants ingested either a protein supplement (PRO; 28.7 g casein protein) or an isoenergetic carbohydrate placebo (PLA). Before and after the 12 wk of training, V˙O2max and endurance exercise performance (~10-km time trial) were assessed on a cycle ergometer. Muscular endurance (total workload achieved during 30 reciprocal isokinetic contractions) was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry and body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied to assess whether training adaptations differed between groups. RESULTS: Endurance exercise training induced an 11% ± 6% increase in V˙O2max (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (PRO, 48 ± 6 to 53 ± 7 mL·min·kg; PLA, 46 ± 5 to 51 ± 6 mL·min·kg; time-treatment interaction, P = 0.50). Time to complete the time trial was reduced by 14% ± 7% (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (time-treatment interaction, P = 0.15). Muscular endurance increased by 6% ± 7% (time effect, P < 0.0001), with no differences between groups (time-treatment interaction, P = 0.84). Leg lean mass showed an increase after training (P < 0.0001), which tended to be greater in PRO compared with PLA (0.5 ± 0.7 vs 0.2 ± 0.6 kg, respectively; time-treatment interaction, P = 0.073). CONCLUSION: Protein supplementation after exercise and before sleep does not further augment the gains in whole-body oxidative capacity and endurance exercise performance after chronic endurance exercise training in recreationally active, healthy young males. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31525168/Protein_Supplementation_Does_Not_Augment_Adaptations_to_Endurance_Exercise_Training L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002028 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -