Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis.
Ann Intern Med 2019; 171(6):421-426AIM

Abstract

On 15 May 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that administration of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors could lead to ketoacidosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. This announcement came more than 2 years after the FDA's first approval of an SGLT2 inhibitor, although the phenomenon had been known for more than 125 years. Luminaries of diabetes research (including Josef von Mering, Frederick Allen, I. Arthur Mirsky, and George Cahill) had described ketosis and ketoacidosis induced by administration of the phytochemical phlorizin, the prototypical SGLT inhibitor, as well as in patients with familial renal glucosuria, a condition that is considered a natural model of SGLT2 inhibition. Neither government regulators nor manufacturers of SGLT2 inhibitors evinced an awareness of this extensive historical record. The absence of historical inquiry delayed notice of ketoacidosis as an adverse reaction, which could have reduced the burden of illness from these drugs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Seventh Doctor Consulting, Princeton, New Jersey (B.R.L.).Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (L.E.G.).University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (S.I.T.).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31525753

Citation

Leslie, Bruce R., et al. "Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 171, no. 6, 2019, pp. 421-426.
Leslie BR, Gerwin LE, Taylor SI. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis. Ann Intern Med. 2019;171(6):421-426.
Leslie, B. R., Gerwin, L. E., & Taylor, S. I. (2019). Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis. Annals of Internal Medicine, 171(6), pp. 421-426. doi:10.7326/M19-1463.
Leslie BR, Gerwin LE, Taylor SI. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis. Ann Intern Med. 2019 Sep 17;171(6):421-426. PubMed PMID: 31525753.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors: Lack of a Complete History Delays Diagnosis. AU - Leslie,Bruce R, AU - Gerwin,Leslie E, AU - Taylor,Simeon I, PY - 2019/9/17/entrez PY - 2019/9/17/pubmed PY - 2019/9/17/medline SP - 421 EP - 426 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 171 IS - 6 N2 - On 15 May 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that administration of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors could lead to ketoacidosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. This announcement came more than 2 years after the FDA's first approval of an SGLT2 inhibitor, although the phenomenon had been known for more than 125 years. Luminaries of diabetes research (including Josef von Mering, Frederick Allen, I. Arthur Mirsky, and George Cahill) had described ketosis and ketoacidosis induced by administration of the phytochemical phlorizin, the prototypical SGLT inhibitor, as well as in patients with familial renal glucosuria, a condition that is considered a natural model of SGLT2 inhibition. Neither government regulators nor manufacturers of SGLT2 inhibitors evinced an awareness of this extensive historical record. The absence of historical inquiry delayed notice of ketoacidosis as an adverse reaction, which could have reduced the burden of illness from these drugs. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31525753/Sodium-Glucose_Cotransporter-2_Inhibitors:_Lack_of_a_Complete_History_Delays_Diagnosis L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.7326/M19-1463 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -