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Multi-disciplinary integration of networking through the RNAS+: Research on other target diseases.
Adv Parasitol. 2019; 105:95-110.AP

Abstract

In 2005, the network decided to increase its number of target diseases to include other helminthic zoonoses such as fascioliasis, clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis and in the process expanding membership to include South Korea, Vietnam, Thailand and Japan. NTDs were eventually included as awareness is heightened on these diseases affecting poor and developing countries. Researches on clonorchiasis and opisthorchiasis unravel the mechanism by which these diseases eventually predispose to cholangiocarcinoma. The liver cancer associated with these liver fluke infections necessitate the need to clarify the global burden of disease of these infections. The magnitude of these liver fluke diseases in endemic countries like China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand is described. Success in elimination of lymphatic filariasis in PR China and Cambodia is highlighted to show how intensified multisectoral collaboration and strong political become strong ingredients in elimination of parasitic diseases like LF. New advances are presented that clarify species and strain differences in Fasciola spp., Paragonimus spp., Taenia spp. and Echinococcocus spp. Conventional diagnostic techniques are compared with new serologic techniques that are being developed. New control strategies such as the Lawa model are presented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines Diliman and University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Graduate School, Quezon City, Philippines. Electronic address: lydialeonardo1152@gmail.com.Geospatial Health, Ingerod, Brastad, Sweden.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, China.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, China.National Helminth Control Program, National Center for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Control, Ministry of Health, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.Lao Tropical and Public Health Institute, Vientianne, Lao People's Democratic Republic.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, China.Asian Tropical Foundation, Filinvest Corporate City, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine Compound, Muntinlupa, Philippines.Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.Department of Pathology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), JL. Agatis, Kampus IPB, Bogor, Indonesia.Department of Pathology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.Ministry of Health, South Jakarta, Indonesia.Department of Medical Research, Ministry of Health & Sports, Yangon, Myanmar.Department of Parasitology, Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam.National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China; Chinese Center for Tropical Diseases Research, Shanghai, China; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; National Center for International Research on Tropical Diseases, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Parasite and Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31530397

Citation

Leonardo, Lydia, et al. "Multi-disciplinary Integration of Networking Through the RNAS+: Research On Other Target Diseases." Advances in Parasitology, vol. 105, 2019, pp. 95-110.
Leonardo L, Bergquist R, Li SZ, et al. Multi-disciplinary integration of networking through the RNAS+: Research on other target diseases. Adv Parasitol. 2019;105:95-110.
Leonardo, L., Bergquist, R., Li, S. Z., Lv, S., Khieu, V., Sayasone, S., Xu, J., Olveda, R., Utzinger, J., Sripa, B., Satrija, F., Tangkawattana, S., Ullyartha, H., Wai, K. T., Nguyen, H., & Zhou, X. N. (2019). Multi-disciplinary integration of networking through the RNAS+: Research on other target diseases. Advances in Parasitology, 105, 95-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.apar.2019.07.010
Leonardo L, et al. Multi-disciplinary Integration of Networking Through the RNAS+: Research On Other Target Diseases. Adv Parasitol. 2019;105:95-110. PubMed PMID: 31530397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multi-disciplinary integration of networking through the RNAS+: Research on other target diseases. AU - Leonardo,Lydia, AU - Bergquist,Robert, AU - Li,Shi-Zhu, AU - Lv,Shan, AU - Khieu,Virak, AU - Sayasone,Somphou, AU - Xu,Jing, AU - Olveda,Remigio, AU - Utzinger,Juerg, AU - Sripa,Banchob, AU - Satrija,Fadjar, AU - Tangkawattana,Sirikachorn, AU - Ullyartha,Helena, AU - Wai,Khin Thet, AU - Nguyen,Hung, AU - Zhou,Xiao-Nong, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2019/9/19/entrez PY - 2019/9/19/pubmed PY - 2020/1/15/medline KW - Angiostrongylosis KW - Cholangiocarcinoma KW - Clonorchiasis KW - Cysticercosis KW - Echinococcosis KW - Opisthorchiasis KW - Paragonimiasis KW - STH SP - 95 EP - 110 JF - Advances in parasitology JO - Adv. Parasitol. VL - 105 N2 - In 2005, the network decided to increase its number of target diseases to include other helminthic zoonoses such as fascioliasis, clonorchiasis, opisthorchiasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis and in the process expanding membership to include South Korea, Vietnam, Thailand and Japan. NTDs were eventually included as awareness is heightened on these diseases affecting poor and developing countries. Researches on clonorchiasis and opisthorchiasis unravel the mechanism by which these diseases eventually predispose to cholangiocarcinoma. The liver cancer associated with these liver fluke infections necessitate the need to clarify the global burden of disease of these infections. The magnitude of these liver fluke diseases in endemic countries like China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand is described. Success in elimination of lymphatic filariasis in PR China and Cambodia is highlighted to show how intensified multisectoral collaboration and strong political become strong ingredients in elimination of parasitic diseases like LF. New advances are presented that clarify species and strain differences in Fasciola spp., Paragonimus spp., Taenia spp. and Echinococcocus spp. Conventional diagnostic techniques are compared with new serologic techniques that are being developed. New control strategies such as the Lawa model are presented. SN - 2163-6079 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31530397/Multi-disciplinary_integration_of_networking_through_the_RNAS+:_Research_on_other_target_diseases L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0065-308X(19)30037-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -