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Neurovascular compression syndrome of the brain stem with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome combined with vestibular paroxysmia and autonomic symptoms.
Drug Discov Ther 2019; 13(4):228-231DD

Abstract

We describe a rare case of neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) of the brain stem and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) complicated with vestibular paroxysmia (VP) and autonomic symptoms. Moreover, we discuss the case with respect to the available information in medical literature. A 36-year-old man with vertigo and nausea had difficulty standing, and was transported by an ambulance to our hospital. He had VP, opsoclonus, cervical myoclonus, anxiety, and restless legs syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging at hospitalization showed that the dolichoectatic vertebral artery was in contact with the postero-lateral side of the pontomedullary junction. He was diagnosed with NVCS of the brain stem (most likely of the input to the vestibular nucleus) associated with contact with the dolichoectatic vertebral artery. Combination therapy using multiple antiepileptic drugs, such as low-dose carbamazepine, clonazepam, and lacosamide, improved his clinical symptoms. He was finally able to walk and was discharged on day 42 after admission. He is being routinely followed-up since then. Further research is needed to confirm the validity of the combination therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.Department of Neurosurgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31534075

Citation

Morinaga, Yusuke, et al. "Neurovascular Compression Syndrome of the Brain Stem With Opsoclonus-myoclonus Syndrome Combined With Vestibular Paroxysmia and Autonomic Symptoms." Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics, vol. 13, no. 4, 2019, pp. 228-231.
Morinaga Y, Nii K, Sakamoto K, et al. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the brain stem with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome combined with vestibular paroxysmia and autonomic symptoms. Drug Discov Ther. 2019;13(4):228-231.
Morinaga, Y., Nii, K., Sakamoto, K., Inoue, R., Mitsutake, T., & Hanada, H. (2019). Neurovascular compression syndrome of the brain stem with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome combined with vestibular paroxysmia and autonomic symptoms. Drug Discoveries & Therapeutics, 13(4), pp. 228-231. doi:10.5582/ddt.2019.01039.
Morinaga Y, et al. Neurovascular Compression Syndrome of the Brain Stem With Opsoclonus-myoclonus Syndrome Combined With Vestibular Paroxysmia and Autonomic Symptoms. Drug Discov Ther. 2019;13(4):228-231. PubMed PMID: 31534075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurovascular compression syndrome of the brain stem with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome combined with vestibular paroxysmia and autonomic symptoms. AU - Morinaga,Yusuke, AU - Nii,Kouhei, AU - Sakamoto,Kimiya, AU - Inoue,Ritsurou, AU - Mitsutake,Takafumi, AU - Hanada,Hayatsura, PY - 2019/9/20/entrez KW - Neurovascular compression syndrome KW - autonomic symptoms KW - brainstem KW - opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome KW - vestibular paroxysmia SP - 228 EP - 231 JF - Drug discoveries & therapeutics JO - Drug Discov Ther VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - We describe a rare case of neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) of the brain stem and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) complicated with vestibular paroxysmia (VP) and autonomic symptoms. Moreover, we discuss the case with respect to the available information in medical literature. A 36-year-old man with vertigo and nausea had difficulty standing, and was transported by an ambulance to our hospital. He had VP, opsoclonus, cervical myoclonus, anxiety, and restless legs syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging at hospitalization showed that the dolichoectatic vertebral artery was in contact with the postero-lateral side of the pontomedullary junction. He was diagnosed with NVCS of the brain stem (most likely of the input to the vestibular nucleus) associated with contact with the dolichoectatic vertebral artery. Combination therapy using multiple antiepileptic drugs, such as low-dose carbamazepine, clonazepam, and lacosamide, improved his clinical symptoms. He was finally able to walk and was discharged on day 42 after admission. He is being routinely followed-up since then. Further research is needed to confirm the validity of the combination therapy. SN - 1881-784X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31534075/Neurovascular_compression_syndrome_of_the_brain_stem_with_opsoclonus-myoclonus_syndrome_combined_with_vestibular_paroxysmia_and_autonomic_symptoms L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.5582/ddt.2019.01039 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -