Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity

Abstract
The water moccasin or cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus, is a semi-aquatic pit viper found throughout the Southeastern United States and into West Texas[1] Their two common names derive from the white-colored membranes in its mouth and living near sources of water. Cottonmouth snakes are part of the Crotalinae family of pit vipers which includes rattlesnakes and copperheads.  Like the other North American pit viper species, identifying features include elliptical pupils, triangular-shaped heads, heat-sensing pits and either a rattle or single row of ventral scales distal to the anal plate.[2][3] Pit viper venom is used to facilitate the capture and digestion of prey and can cause significant toxicity in humans. Water moccasins typically feed on fish, turtles and small mammals but will bite humans when provoked or disturbed. There is not much data specific to the evaluation and treatment of cottonmouth envenomation.  This activity, therefore, will discuss cottonmouth envenomation in the context of other pit piper envenomation.

Publisher

StatPearls Publishing
Treasure Island (FL)

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31536252

Citation

Thackston D, Wills BK: Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, 2020, Treasure Island (FL).
Thackston D, Wills BK. Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity. StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
Thackston D & Wills BK. (2020). Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing
Thackston D, Wills BK. Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - CHAP T1 - Water Moccasin Snake Toxicity BT - StatPearls A1 - Thackston,Derek, AU - Wills,Brandon K., Y1 - 2020/01// PY - 2019/9/20/pubmed PY - 2019/9/20/medline PY - 2019/9/20/entrez N2 - The water moccasin or cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus, is a semi-aquatic pit viper found throughout the Southeastern United States and into West Texas[1] Their two common names derive from the white-colored membranes in its mouth and living near sources of water. Cottonmouth snakes are part of the Crotalinae family of pit vipers which includes rattlesnakes and copperheads.  Like the other North American pit viper species, identifying features include elliptical pupils, triangular-shaped heads, heat-sensing pits and either a rattle or single row of ventral scales distal to the anal plate.[2][3] Pit viper venom is used to facilitate the capture and digestion of prey and can cause significant toxicity in humans. Water moccasins typically feed on fish, turtles and small mammals but will bite humans when provoked or disturbed. There is not much data specific to the evaluation and treatment of cottonmouth envenomation.  This activity, therefore, will discuss cottonmouth envenomation in the context of other pit piper envenomation. PB - StatPearls Publishing CY - Treasure Island (FL) UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31536252/StatPearls:_Water_Moccasin_Snake_Toxicity L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK546645 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.