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Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population.
Genes (Basel) 2019; 10(9)G

Abstract

Thyroid cancer is rare in the pediatric population, but thyroid carcinomas occurring in children carry a unique set of clinical, pathologic, and molecular characteristics. In comparison to adults, children more often present with aggressive, advanced stage disease. This is at least in part due to the underlying biologic and molecular differences between pediatric and adult thyroid cancer. Specifically, papillary thyroid carcinoma (which accounts for approximately 90% of pediatric thyroid cancer) has a high rate of gene fusions which influence the histologic subtypes encountered in pediatric thyroid tumors, are associated with more extensive extrathyroidal disease, and offer unique options for targeted medical therapies. Differences are also seen in pediatric follicular thyroid cancer, although there are few studies of non-papillary pediatric thyroid tumors published in the literature due to their rarity, and in medullary carcinoma, which is most frequently diagnosed in the pediatric population in the setting of prophylactic thyroidectomies for known multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes. The overall shift in the spectrum of histotypes and underlying molecular alterations common in pediatric thyroid cancer is important to recognize as it may directly influence diagnostic test selection and therapeutic recommendations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, 1959 NE Pacific St, Box 357110, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. vpauls@uw.edu.Dept. of Laboratories, Seattle Children's Hospital, OC.8.720; 4800 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. erin.rudzinski@seattlechildrens.org.University of Washington Medical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Seattle Children's Hospital, MB.8.501, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. doug.hawkins@seattlechildrens.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31540418

Citation

Paulson, Vera A., et al. "Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population." Genes, vol. 10, no. 9, 2019.
Paulson VA, Rudzinski ER, Hawkins DS. Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population. Genes (Basel). 2019;10(9).
Paulson, V. A., Rudzinski, E. R., & Hawkins, D. S. (2019). Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population. Genes, 10(9), doi:10.3390/genes10090723.
Paulson VA, Rudzinski ER, Hawkins DS. Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population. Genes (Basel). 2019 09 18;10(9) PubMed PMID: 31540418.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thyroid Cancer in the Pediatric Population. AU - Paulson,Vera A, AU - Rudzinski,Erin R, AU - Hawkins,Douglas S, Y1 - 2019/09/18/ PY - 2019/07/12/received PY - 2019/09/11/revised PY - 2019/09/12/accepted PY - 2019/9/22/entrez PY - 2019/9/22/pubmed PY - 2019/9/22/medline KW - gene rearrangements KW - molecular testing KW - pediatric thyroid cancer KW - targeted cancer therapy JF - Genes JO - Genes (Basel) VL - 10 IS - 9 N2 - Thyroid cancer is rare in the pediatric population, but thyroid carcinomas occurring in children carry a unique set of clinical, pathologic, and molecular characteristics. In comparison to adults, children more often present with aggressive, advanced stage disease. This is at least in part due to the underlying biologic and molecular differences between pediatric and adult thyroid cancer. Specifically, papillary thyroid carcinoma (which accounts for approximately 90% of pediatric thyroid cancer) has a high rate of gene fusions which influence the histologic subtypes encountered in pediatric thyroid tumors, are associated with more extensive extrathyroidal disease, and offer unique options for targeted medical therapies. Differences are also seen in pediatric follicular thyroid cancer, although there are few studies of non-papillary pediatric thyroid tumors published in the literature due to their rarity, and in medullary carcinoma, which is most frequently diagnosed in the pediatric population in the setting of prophylactic thyroidectomies for known multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes. The overall shift in the spectrum of histotypes and underlying molecular alterations common in pediatric thyroid cancer is important to recognize as it may directly influence diagnostic test selection and therapeutic recommendations. SN - 2073-4425 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31540418/Thyroid_Cancer_in_the_Pediatric_Population L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=genes10090723 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -