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Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders.
Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):13656SR

Abstract

Spiders are commonly found in terrestrial environments and many rely heavily on their silks for fitness related tasks such as reproduction and dispersal. Although rare, a few species occupy aquatic or semi-aquatic habitats and for them, silk-related specializations are also essential to survive in aquatic environments. Most spider silks studied to date are from cob-web and orb-web weaving species, leaving the silks from many other terrestrial spiders as well as water-associated spiders largely undescribed. Here, we characterize silks from three Dictynoidea species: the aquatic spiders Argyroneta aquatica and Desis marina as well as the terrestrial Badumna longinqua. From silk gland RNA-Seq libraries, we report a total of 47 different homologs of the spidroin (spider fibroin) gene family. Some of these 47 spidroins correspond to known spidroin types (aciniform, ampullate, cribellar, pyriform, and tubuliform), while other spidroins represent novel branches of the spidroin gene family. We also report a hydrophobic amino acid motif (GV) that, to date, is found only in the spidroins of aquatic and semi-aquatic spiders. Comparison of spider silk sequences to the silks from other water-associated arthropods, shows that there is a diversity of strategies to function in aquatic environments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92591, USA. scorr006@ucr.edu.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92591, USA. J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, 28050, USA.Meeuwen-Gruitrode, Limburg, 3670, Belgium.Limburg Dome for Nature Study, Provincial Nature Center, Genk, 3600, Belgium.Photographing Nature, Rotorua, New Zealand.Photographing Nature, Rotorua, New Zealand.Canterbury Museum, Christchurch, 8013, New Zealand.Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92591, USA. Division of Invertebrate Zoology and Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, 10024, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31541123

Citation

Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M., et al. "Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 13656.
Correa-Garhwal SM, Clarke TH, Janssen M, et al. Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):13656.
Correa-Garhwal, S. M., Clarke, T. H., Janssen, M., Crevecoeur, L., McQuillan, B. N., Simpson, A. H., ... Hayashi, C. Y. (2019). Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 13656. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49587-y.
Correa-Garhwal SM, et al. Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders. Sci Rep. 2019 Sep 20;9(1):13656. PubMed PMID: 31541123.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spidroins and Silk Fibers of Aquatic Spiders. AU - Correa-Garhwal,Sandra M, AU - Clarke,Thomas H,3rd AU - Janssen,Marc, AU - Crevecoeur,Luc, AU - McQuillan,Bryce N, AU - Simpson,Angela H, AU - Vink,Cor J, AU - Hayashi,Cheryl Y, Y1 - 2019/09/20/ PY - 2019/01/15/received PY - 2019/08/24/accepted PY - 2019/9/22/entrez SP - 13656 EP - 13656 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Spiders are commonly found in terrestrial environments and many rely heavily on their silks for fitness related tasks such as reproduction and dispersal. Although rare, a few species occupy aquatic or semi-aquatic habitats and for them, silk-related specializations are also essential to survive in aquatic environments. Most spider silks studied to date are from cob-web and orb-web weaving species, leaving the silks from many other terrestrial spiders as well as water-associated spiders largely undescribed. Here, we characterize silks from three Dictynoidea species: the aquatic spiders Argyroneta aquatica and Desis marina as well as the terrestrial Badumna longinqua. From silk gland RNA-Seq libraries, we report a total of 47 different homologs of the spidroin (spider fibroin) gene family. Some of these 47 spidroins correspond to known spidroin types (aciniform, ampullate, cribellar, pyriform, and tubuliform), while other spidroins represent novel branches of the spidroin gene family. We also report a hydrophobic amino acid motif (GV) that, to date, is found only in the spidroins of aquatic and semi-aquatic spiders. Comparison of spider silk sequences to the silks from other water-associated arthropods, shows that there is a diversity of strategies to function in aquatic environments. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31541123/Spidroins_and_Silk_Fibers_of_Aquatic_Spiders L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-49587-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -