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Epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens in atopic dermatitis: What do we know?

Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease mainly affecting children, which has no definitive curative therapy apart from natural outgrowing. AD is persistent in 30%-40% of children. Epithelial barrier dysfunction in AD is a significant risk factor for the development of epicutaneous food sensitization, food allergy, and other allergic disorders. There is evidence that prophylactic emollient applications from birth may be useful for primary prevention of AD, but biomarkers are needed to guide cost-effective targeted therapy for high-risk individuals. In established early-onset AD, secondary preventive strategies are needed to attenuate progression to other allergic disorders such as food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis (the atopic march). This review aims to describe the mechanisms underpinning the development of epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens and progression to clinical food allergy; summarize current evidence for interventions to halt the progression from AD to food sensitization and clinical food allergy; and highlight unmet needs and directions for future research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31541586

Citation

Tham, Elizabeth Huiwen, et al. "Epicutaneous Sensitization to Food Allergens in Atopic Dermatitis: what Do We Know?" Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2019.
Tham EH, Rajakulendran M, Lee BW, et al. Epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens in atopic dermatitis: What do we know? Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2019.
Tham, E. H., Rajakulendran, M., Lee, B. W., & Van Bever, H. P. S. (2019). Epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens in atopic dermatitis: What do we know? Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, doi:10.1111/pai.13127.
Tham EH, et al. Epicutaneous Sensitization to Food Allergens in Atopic Dermatitis: what Do We Know. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2019 Sep 21; PubMed PMID: 31541586.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens in atopic dermatitis: What do we know? AU - Tham,Elizabeth Huiwen, AU - Rajakulendran,Mohana, AU - Lee,Bee Wah, AU - Van Bever,Hugo P S, Y1 - 2019/09/21/ PY - 2019/06/24/received PY - 2019/08/05/revised PY - 2019/09/12/accepted PY - 2019/9/22/pubmed PY - 2019/9/22/medline PY - 2019/9/22/entrez KW - allergy prevention KW - anaphylaxis KW - atopic dermatitis KW - atopic march KW - epicutaneous sensitization KW - food allergens KW - food allergy KW - food hypersensitivity KW - nutrition KW - oral tolerance JF - Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology JO - Pediatr Allergy Immunol N2 - Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease mainly affecting children, which has no definitive curative therapy apart from natural outgrowing. AD is persistent in 30%-40% of children. Epithelial barrier dysfunction in AD is a significant risk factor for the development of epicutaneous food sensitization, food allergy, and other allergic disorders. There is evidence that prophylactic emollient applications from birth may be useful for primary prevention of AD, but biomarkers are needed to guide cost-effective targeted therapy for high-risk individuals. In established early-onset AD, secondary preventive strategies are needed to attenuate progression to other allergic disorders such as food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis (the atopic march). This review aims to describe the mechanisms underpinning the development of epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens and progression to clinical food allergy; summarize current evidence for interventions to halt the progression from AD to food sensitization and clinical food allergy; and highlight unmet needs and directions for future research. SN - 1399-3038 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31541586/Epicutaneous_sensitization_to_food_allergens_in_Atopic_Dermatitis:_What_do_we_know L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/pai.13127 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -