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Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting.
J Infect Dis. 2020 06 11; 221(12):2018-2025.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The once-in-a-lifetime recommendation for vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV) has been controversial, leading to increased scrutiny of the durability of immunity after 17D vaccination.

METHODS

This is a cross-sectional analysis of 17D vaccinees living in nonendemic Portland, Oregon. Neutralization assays were used to determine YFV immunity. The relationships between 17D immunity and vaccination history, demographics, and travel were evaluated using nominal logistic regression.

RESULTS

Seventy-one of 92 (77.2%) subjects were YFV seropositive (90 percent plaque reduction neutralization test ≥1:10) at all timepoints, and 24 of 38 (63.8%) were YFV seropositive at ≥10 years after single-dose vaccination. No relationship was found between YFV immunity and time in endemic countries, other flavivirus immunity, or demographics. Subjects were most likely to become seronegative between 3 and 12 years postvaccination (logistic regression, odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.73). A comparison of our results and 4 previous studies of YFV nonendemic vaccinees found that overall, 79% (95% CI, 70%-86%) of vaccinees are likely to be seropositive ≥10 years postvaccination.

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that 1 in 5 17D vaccinees will lack neutralizing antibodies at ~10 years postvaccination, and a booster vaccination should be considered for nonendemic vaccinees before travel to regions where there is a high risk of YFV transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Portland.Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute, Portland.Department of Infection Prevention and Control, Portland.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Portland.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Portland. Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton.Najit Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, Oregon.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Portland. Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University,, Portland. OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, Oregon Health and Science University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31545367

Citation

Kareko, Bettie W., et al. "Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 221, no. 12, 2020, pp. 2018-2025.
Kareko BW, Booty BL, Nix CD, et al. Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting. J Infect Dis. 2020;221(12):2018-2025.
Kareko, B. W., Booty, B. L., Nix, C. D., Lyski, Z. L., Slifka, M. K., Amanna, I. J., & Messer, W. B. (2020). Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 221(12), 2018-2025. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz374
Kareko BW, et al. Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting. J Infect Dis. 2020 06 11;221(12):2018-2025. PubMed PMID: 31545367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Persistence of Neutralizing Antibody Responses Among Yellow Fever Virus 17D Vaccinees Living in a Nonendemic Setting. AU - Kareko,Bettie W, AU - Booty,Brian L, AU - Nix,Chad D, AU - Lyski,Zoe L, AU - Slifka,Mark K, AU - Amanna,Ian J, AU - Messer,William B, PY - 2019/01/16/received PY - 2019/08/13/accepted PY - 2019/9/24/pubmed PY - 2021/2/20/medline PY - 2019/9/24/entrez KW - 17D KW - immunity KW - neutralizing antibodies KW - vaccine SP - 2018 EP - 2025 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 221 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The once-in-a-lifetime recommendation for vaccination against yellow fever virus (YFV) has been controversial, leading to increased scrutiny of the durability of immunity after 17D vaccination. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional analysis of 17D vaccinees living in nonendemic Portland, Oregon. Neutralization assays were used to determine YFV immunity. The relationships between 17D immunity and vaccination history, demographics, and travel were evaluated using nominal logistic regression. RESULTS: Seventy-one of 92 (77.2%) subjects were YFV seropositive (90 percent plaque reduction neutralization test ≥1:10) at all timepoints, and 24 of 38 (63.8%) were YFV seropositive at ≥10 years after single-dose vaccination. No relationship was found between YFV immunity and time in endemic countries, other flavivirus immunity, or demographics. Subjects were most likely to become seronegative between 3 and 12 years postvaccination (logistic regression, odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.73). A comparison of our results and 4 previous studies of YFV nonendemic vaccinees found that overall, 79% (95% CI, 70%-86%) of vaccinees are likely to be seropositive ≥10 years postvaccination. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that 1 in 5 17D vaccinees will lack neutralizing antibodies at ~10 years postvaccination, and a booster vaccination should be considered for nonendemic vaccinees before travel to regions where there is a high risk of YFV transmission. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31545367/Persistence_of_Neutralizing_Antibody_Responses_Among_Yellow_Fever_Virus_17D_Vaccinees_Living_in_a_Nonendemic_Setting_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiz374 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -