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Endemic Kashin-Beck disease: A food-sourced osteoarthropathy.
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2020 04; 50(2):366-372.SA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is an endemic osteoarthropathy, which causes disability and heavy socioeconomic burdens. The preventive measures have been taken in the past few decades. However, recent KBD-epidemiological trend and comprehensive effect of its preventive measures need to be evaluated.

METHODS

By employing typical survey, cross-sectional survey, case-control study, intervention trial, and national surveillance, the present study summarizes comprehensive role of KBD-preventive measures.

RESULTS

The endemic KBD is distributed in a long and narrow area of the world. The latest epidemic began in the late 1950s and lasted until the end of 1980s. Epidemiology of the KBD was characterized by early-onset, gender equality, agricultural area, regional discrepancy, family aggregation, annual fluctuation, etc. Multivariate regression analysis suggested that etiology of the KBD was food-related factors such as fungal contamination of grains, selenium deficiency, imbalance of protein intake, etc. A series of intervention measures for KBD control had been implemented since 1990s, and involved more than 300 million residents. National incidences were 22.1% in 1990, 16.0% in 1995, 12.3% in 2000, 5.5% in 2005, 0.38% in 2010, and 0.18 in 2015, respectively. Although new patients were annually decreased, it still affected 22,567,600 inhabitants and there were 574,925 patients in 2016.

CONCLUSIONS

Etiology of the KBD is food-sourced. Its decreased incidence may attribute to an effective implementation of preventive measures. It is possible to eradicate KBD from the earth in the near future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China.Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081, People's Republic of China; Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; China and Russia Medical Research Center, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: hrbmusdj@hrbmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31548049

Citation

Wang, Kewei, et al. "Endemic Kashin-Beck Disease: a Food-sourced Osteoarthropathy." Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 50, no. 2, 2020, pp. 366-372.
Wang K, Yu J, Liu H, et al. Endemic Kashin-Beck disease: A food-sourced osteoarthropathy. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2020;50(2):366-372.
Wang, K., Yu, J., Liu, H., Liu, Y., Liu, N., Cao, Y., Zhang, X., & Sun, D. (2020). Endemic Kashin-Beck disease: A food-sourced osteoarthropathy. Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, 50(2), 366-372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2019.07.014
Wang K, et al. Endemic Kashin-Beck Disease: a Food-sourced Osteoarthropathy. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2020;50(2):366-372. PubMed PMID: 31548049.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endemic Kashin-Beck disease: A food-sourced osteoarthropathy. AU - Wang,Kewei, AU - Yu,Jun, AU - Liu,Hui, AU - Liu,Yunqi, AU - Liu,Ning, AU - Cao,Yanhong, AU - Zhang,Xufeng, AU - Sun,Dianjun, Y1 - 2019/08/02/ PY - 2018/12/15/received PY - 2019/07/19/revised PY - 2019/07/31/accepted PY - 2019/9/25/pubmed PY - 2019/9/25/medline PY - 2019/9/25/entrez KW - Fungal contamination of grain KW - Imbalance of protein intake KW - Intervention trial KW - Kashin–Beck disease KW - Multivariate linear regression KW - Selenium deficiency SP - 366 EP - 372 JF - Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism JO - Semin. Arthritis Rheum. VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is an endemic osteoarthropathy, which causes disability and heavy socioeconomic burdens. The preventive measures have been taken in the past few decades. However, recent KBD-epidemiological trend and comprehensive effect of its preventive measures need to be evaluated. METHODS: By employing typical survey, cross-sectional survey, case-control study, intervention trial, and national surveillance, the present study summarizes comprehensive role of KBD-preventive measures. RESULTS: The endemic KBD is distributed in a long and narrow area of the world. The latest epidemic began in the late 1950s and lasted until the end of 1980s. Epidemiology of the KBD was characterized by early-onset, gender equality, agricultural area, regional discrepancy, family aggregation, annual fluctuation, etc. Multivariate regression analysis suggested that etiology of the KBD was food-related factors such as fungal contamination of grains, selenium deficiency, imbalance of protein intake, etc. A series of intervention measures for KBD control had been implemented since 1990s, and involved more than 300 million residents. National incidences were 22.1% in 1990, 16.0% in 1995, 12.3% in 2000, 5.5% in 2005, 0.38% in 2010, and 0.18 in 2015, respectively. Although new patients were annually decreased, it still affected 22,567,600 inhabitants and there were 574,925 patients in 2016. CONCLUSIONS: Etiology of the KBD is food-sourced. Its decreased incidence may attribute to an effective implementation of preventive measures. It is possible to eradicate KBD from the earth in the near future. SN - 1532-866X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31548049/Endemic_Kashin-Beck_disease:_A_food-sourced_osteoarthropathy L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0049-0172(18)30759-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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