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Freedom from the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share.
J Transp Geogr 2019; 74:91-96JT

Abstract

Background

Bike sharing systems have potential to substantially boost active transportation levels (and consequent physical and mental health) in urban populations. We explored equity of spatial access in a novel 'dockless' bike share system that does not that constrain bike pickup and drop-off locations to docking stations.

Methods

Starting in July 2017, Seattle, Washington piloted a dockless bike share system that made 10,000 bikes available. We merged data on resident sociodemographic and economic characteristics from the American Community Survey about 93 defined neighborhoods with data about bike locations, bike idle time, and which neighborhoods operators rebalanced bikes to. We used mapping and descriptive statistics to compare access between neighborhoods along sociodemographic and economic lines.

Results

With many bikes available, no neighborhood was consistently excluded from access. However, the average availability ranged from 3 bikes per day to 341 per day. Neighborhoods with more bikes had more college-educated residents (median 75% college-educated vs. 65%) and local community resources (median opportunity index score of 24 vs. 19), and higher incomes (median 83,202 vs. 71,296). Rebalancing destinations were strongly correlated with neighborhood demand (r=0.61).

Conclusions

The overall scale of the dockless system ensured there was baseline access throughout Seattle. We observed modest inequities in access along sociodemographic lines, similar to prior findings in studies of docked bike share systems. Dockless bike share systems hold promise for offering equitable spatial access to bike sharing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC. Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.The Information School, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.The Information School, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC.Washington State Transportation Center, University of Washington, Seattle.Urban Health Collaborative, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31548761

Citation

Mooney, Stephen J., et al. "Freedom From the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share." Journal of Transport Geography, vol. 74, 2019, pp. 91-96.
Mooney SJ, Hosford K, Howe B, et al. Freedom from the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share. J Transp Geogr. 2019;74:91-96.
Mooney, S. J., Hosford, K., Howe, B., Yan, A., Winters, M., Bassok, A., & Hirsch, J. A. (2019). Freedom from the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share. Journal of Transport Geography, 74, pp. 91-96. doi:10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.11.009.
Mooney SJ, et al. Freedom From the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share. J Transp Geogr. 2019;74:91-96. PubMed PMID: 31548761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Freedom from the Station: Spatial Equity in Access to Dockless Bike Share. AU - Mooney,Stephen J, AU - Hosford,Kate, AU - Howe,Bill, AU - Yan,An, AU - Winters,Meghan, AU - Bassok,Alon, AU - Hirsch,Jana A, Y1 - 2018/11/21/ PY - 2020/01/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/9/25/entrez PY - 2019/9/25/pubmed PY - 2019/9/25/medline SP - 91 EP - 96 JF - Journal of transport geography JO - J Transp Geogr VL - 74 N2 - Background: Bike sharing systems have potential to substantially boost active transportation levels (and consequent physical and mental health) in urban populations. We explored equity of spatial access in a novel 'dockless' bike share system that does not that constrain bike pickup and drop-off locations to docking stations. Methods: Starting in July 2017, Seattle, Washington piloted a dockless bike share system that made 10,000 bikes available. We merged data on resident sociodemographic and economic characteristics from the American Community Survey about 93 defined neighborhoods with data about bike locations, bike idle time, and which neighborhoods operators rebalanced bikes to. We used mapping and descriptive statistics to compare access between neighborhoods along sociodemographic and economic lines. Results: With many bikes available, no neighborhood was consistently excluded from access. However, the average availability ranged from 3 bikes per day to 341 per day. Neighborhoods with more bikes had more college-educated residents (median 75% college-educated vs. 65%) and local community resources (median opportunity index score of 24 vs. 19), and higher incomes (median 83,202 vs. 71,296). Rebalancing destinations were strongly correlated with neighborhood demand (r=0.61). Conclusions: The overall scale of the dockless system ensured there was baseline access throughout Seattle. We observed modest inequities in access along sociodemographic lines, similar to prior findings in studies of docked bike share systems. Dockless bike share systems hold promise for offering equitable spatial access to bike sharing. SN - 0966-6923 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31548761/Freedom_from_the_Station:_Spatial_Equity_in_Access_to_Dockless_Bike_Share DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -