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[Epidemiological and clinical study on bee venom allergy among beekeepers].

Abstract

A randomized population of 222 beekeepers from Lombardy (203 males, 19 females, of mean age 42.5 years) was studied to determine the frequency of allergic reactions to bee sting. The type of reactions, the clinical evolution at the subsequent stings and the risk factors concerning the development of allergy (presence of venom specific IgE, number of stings in a year, atopy, age) were evaluated. It was found that 170 beekeepers never presented reactions to stings while 52 (23.4%) showed allergic reactions consisting in 31 large local reactions and 21 systemic reactions; of these, 3 (5.7%) were life-threatening. In the group of beekeepers with allergic reactions at the subsequent stings, 26 (50%) showed a spontaneous loss of reactivity, 16 (30.8%) presented persistent, but unchanged in severity, reactions and 10 (19.2%) had a worsening of symptoms. Specific honey bee venom IgE levels (measured by means of RAST) were significantly lower in immune beekeepers when compared with the group with allergic reactions (p less than 0.01) and in beekeepers with previous allergy when compared to the ones with persistent reactions (p less than 0.05). We also found significant differences about the number of stings received in a year by beekeepers with persistent allergic reactions (17.5 stings), beekeepers with previous allergy (89.8 stings) and immune subjects (126.9 stings). On the contrary, no significant differences were detected about the age and the presence of atopy. These results suggest that practice of bee-keeping induces a relatively high incidence of allergic reactions but with a trend to the spontaneous improvement of symptoms and a low incidence of severe reactions.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Istituto di Clinica Medica I, Università degli Studi di Milano.

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Source

MeSH

Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anaphylaxis
Bee Venoms
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Immunoglobulin E
Insect Bites and Stings
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases
Radioallergosorbent Test
Risk Factors

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ita

PubMed ID

3154984

Citation

Pastorello, E A., et al. "[Epidemiological and Clinical Study On Bee Venom Allergy Among Beekeepers]." Bollettino dell'Istituto Sieroterapico Milanese, vol. 67, no. 5-6, 1988, pp. 386-92.
Pastorello EA, Incorvaia C, Sarassi A, et al. [Epidemiological and clinical study on bee venom allergy among beekeepers]. Boll Ist Sieroter Milan. 1988;67(5-6):386-92.
Pastorello, E. A., Incorvaia, C., Sarassi, A., Qualizza, R., Bigi, A., & Farioli, L. (1988). [Epidemiological and clinical study on bee venom allergy among beekeepers]. Bollettino dell'Istituto Sieroterapico Milanese, 67(5-6), pp. 386-92.
Pastorello EA, et al. [Epidemiological and Clinical Study On Bee Venom Allergy Among Beekeepers]. Boll Ist Sieroter Milan. 1988;67(5-6):386-92. PubMed PMID: 3154984.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Epidemiological and clinical study on bee venom allergy among beekeepers]. AU - Pastorello,E A, AU - Incorvaia,C, AU - Sarassi,A, AU - Qualizza,R, AU - Bigi,A, AU - Farioli,L, PY - 1988/1/1/pubmed PY - 1988/1/1/medline PY - 1988/1/1/entrez SP - 386 EP - 92 JF - Bollettino dell'Istituto sieroterapico milanese JO - Boll Ist Sieroter Milan VL - 67 IS - 5-6 N2 - A randomized population of 222 beekeepers from Lombardy (203 males, 19 females, of mean age 42.5 years) was studied to determine the frequency of allergic reactions to bee sting. The type of reactions, the clinical evolution at the subsequent stings and the risk factors concerning the development of allergy (presence of venom specific IgE, number of stings in a year, atopy, age) were evaluated. It was found that 170 beekeepers never presented reactions to stings while 52 (23.4%) showed allergic reactions consisting in 31 large local reactions and 21 systemic reactions; of these, 3 (5.7%) were life-threatening. In the group of beekeepers with allergic reactions at the subsequent stings, 26 (50%) showed a spontaneous loss of reactivity, 16 (30.8%) presented persistent, but unchanged in severity, reactions and 10 (19.2%) had a worsening of symptoms. Specific honey bee venom IgE levels (measured by means of RAST) were significantly lower in immune beekeepers when compared with the group with allergic reactions (p less than 0.01) and in beekeepers with previous allergy when compared to the ones with persistent reactions (p less than 0.05). We also found significant differences about the number of stings received in a year by beekeepers with persistent allergic reactions (17.5 stings), beekeepers with previous allergy (89.8 stings) and immune subjects (126.9 stings). On the contrary, no significant differences were detected about the age and the presence of atopy. These results suggest that practice of bee-keeping induces a relatively high incidence of allergic reactions but with a trend to the spontaneous improvement of symptoms and a low incidence of severe reactions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0021-2547 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3154984/[Epidemiological_and_clinical_study_on_bee_venom_allergy_among_beekeepers]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/occupationalhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -